Noahide News

 

Part 130

Feb. 28 2005 

Day 102 of 1290 of 2300

 

 The FINISH 

of Iniquity unto desolation for them who Deny the Christ, Jesus the Lord.

mason seal

Extra Extra

 

Iraq Nohide

Saudia Arabia Noahide

Lebanon now Noahide

Jor-Dan Noahide

Egypt, Iran and Syria next up

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/4305927.stm

Lebanese ministers resign office

Lebanon's Prime Minister Omar Karami has announced he and his government are resigning, two weeks after the murder of former PM Rafik Hariri.

The move came as crowds protested in Beirut, calling for Syrian troops to leave the country.

The Lebanese parliament was also debating an opposition-sponsored motion of no-confidence in the government.

"I am keen the government will not be a hurdle in front of those who want the good for this country," Mr Karami said.

"I declare the resignation of the government that I had the honour to head. May God preserve Lebanon."

His announcement came after a break in the parliamentary debate, which was being televised live.

A cheer went up among more than 10,000 protesters who had gathered in Martyrs Square to demand the resignation of the government and the withdrawal of Syrian troops.

They had defied a ban on demonstrations, which Interior Minister Suleiman Franjieh said had been made on the grounds of "supreme national interests".

'Internal affair'

Lebanon's President Emile Lahoud accepted the resignation of the government and asked it to continue in a caretaker capacity, a statement said.

Syria's immediate reaction was non-committal, saying only that it was "an internal affair" for Lebanon.

Both Mr Karami's government and the Syrian government have been accused of involvement in the 14 February assassination of Mr Hariri - charges they deny.

Earlier, Mr Karami - who took office after Mr Hariri resigned last year - said those who accused his government of involvement in the killing "committed a grave injustice".

Before the debate opened, MPs observed a minute's silence in memory of Mr Hariri. "I accuse this government of incitement, negligence and shortcomings at the least, and of covering up its planning at the most... if not executing," the attack, said former minister Marwan Hamadeh.

Protesters were able to watch the live debate from giant TV screens in Beirut's Martyrs Square. Many had spent the night in the square, wrapped in blankets or under tents, before the ban came into force at 0500 (0300 GMT).

But, despite army checkpoints around the city, people were still able to get to the square throughout the day and the protest was passing off peacefully, said our correspondent.

Many schools and businesses remained shut across the country, following a call by the opposition for a general strike.

Troop withdrawal

Earlier, US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State David Satterfield met Lebanese Foreign Minister Mahmoud Hammoud.

He said he reiterated Washington's demand that Syria comply with UN resolution 1559, passed in September, calling for the withdrawal of its troops from Lebanon.

"We want to see free and fair elections take place [in Lebanon] this spring," he said.

"It's important that steps take place on the ground prior to those elections including the beginning of the implementation of Resolution 1559."

Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk al-Sharaa has rejected calls for a full withdrawal from Lebanon, saying this is something not even the Lebanese want.

Damascus said last week that it would draw it troops back from western Lebanon to areas nearer the Syrian border, though it did not specify when.

____

http://reuters.myway.com/article/20050228/2005-02-28T181940Z_01_L28051548_RTRIDST_0_NEWS-SYRIA-DC.html

Lebanon Govt. Quits, Pressure Mounts on Syria

BEIRUT (Reuters) - Lebanon's Syrian-backed government collapsed Monday, piling more pressure on Damascus, already under fire from the United States and Israel.

Prime Minister Omar Karami, under opposition fire since the Feb. 14 assassination of his predecessor Rafik al-Hariri, told parliament his government was resigning to ensure that it "does not become an obstacle to the good of the country."

The news delighted thousands of flag-waving demonstrators who had defied an official ban to protest at Syrian domination of Lebanon. Banks, schools and businesses had closed after an opposition call for an anti-Syrian general strike.

Druze opposition leader Walid Jumblatt said the "people have won" and called for calm. "Today we are at a new turning point in the history of the country," he said.

Noahide news
... Support for the spread of the Seven Noahide Commandments by the Druze spiritual
leader
contains within it echoes of the Biblical narrative itself.

 

A Syrian official source, who asked not to be named, said only: "This is an internal affair. Lebanon has the constitutional channels that govern these issues."

Syria plays a dominant role in Lebanon and maintains 14,000 troops there. Pressure has been growing within Lebanon and from abroad for a complete military withdrawal.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said he thought Washington might eventually resort to military action against his country.

"Washington has imposed sanctions on us and isolated us in the past, but each time the circle hasn't closed around us," Assad told Italy's Repubblica newspaper.

"If, however, you ask me if I'm expecting an armed attack, well I've seen it coming since the end of the war in Iraq."

Asked if an attack was imminent, Assad said: "I don't think so, for now it's just skirmishing. True, the White House language, if looked at in detail, leads one to expect a campaign similar to the one that led up to attack on Iraq."

U.S. PRESSURE

Syria has come under intense diplomatic fire from Washington since Hariri's killing in a huge bomb blast in Beirut. Many Lebanese blame Syria, which denies responsibility.

Mossad sits quietly...who it most benefits

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State David Satterfield, visiting Lebanon, said Washington wanted "concrete steps" from Syria on insurgent infiltrations in Iraq, the presence of Palestinian militants in Damascus and of Syrian troops in Lebanon.

"Syria should share with the rest of the Middle East, with the rest of the international community, the hope that we have for a stable, prosperous, free Iraq," he said.

Noahide region

In a move viewed by some as an attempt to placate Washington, Syria played a role in the capture of Saddam Hussein's half-brother, Sabawi Ibrahim al-Hasan al-Tikriti, accused of directing the Iraqi insurgency from Syria.

Iraqi government sources said he was seized by Syrian Kurds in northeast Syria and handed to Iraqi Kurds before being taken into custody by Iraq's forces. Syrian Kurds are tightly watched by Damascus and are unlikely to have acted without its approval.

British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw welcomed the apparent Syrian role in the capture and said he hoped Damascus was "reassessing its strategic position." But he said terrorists in Iraq were still operating from Syrian soil.

Israel launched a campaign Monday to seek international support for its allegations that Syria was linked to a Palestinian suicide bombing that killed five Israelis Friday and punctured a Israeli-Palestinian cease-fire.

Israel hopes that giving foreign diplomats a glimpse of its intelligence on Friday's attack on a Tel Aviv nightclub will encourage a London conference on Palestinian reforms, set for Tuesday, to push Palestinians to crack down on militant groups.

Israel says Syria-based leaders of the Palestinian militant group Islamic Jihad ordered the bombing and, since it hosts them, the Syrian government therefore shares responsibility.

Assad dismissed Israel's accusation as "pointlessly offensive" and denied any role in the attack, which shattered a Feb. 8 truce declared by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon.

Israel's Deputy Defense Minister Zeev Boim said Sunday it was "certainly possible" Israel could strike at Syria, but Vice Premier Shimon Peres signaled Israel was likely to hold fire while Washington led its own pressure campaign.

Israel last attacked in Syria when warplanes bombed a suspected base used by Palestinian militants in October 2003 after a suicide bombing that killed 23 Israelis.

A Lebanese opposition parliamentarian called for popular protests to continue in Lebanon until Syria quits the country.

"The battle is long, and this is the first step, this is the battle for freedom, sovereignty and independence," Ghattas Khouri told protesters after news of Karami's resignation

Moving right along to Moshiach ben satan and his Universal religion unto satan, Noahide

____

Because JEWRY is a RELIGION unto Satan and no race of beings, for they come out of every nation of useless genealogy

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1109561141249

Proving you are Jewish may get harder

Immigrants who were not connected to an Orthodox institution in their mother country may find it more difficult to marry in Israel.

Chief Sephardi Rabbi of Israel Shlomo Amar, told about 300 marriage registrars, who gathered Tuesday in Bnei Brak, that they would no longer be allowed to authenticate the Judaism of potential brides and grooms.

Three expert investigators, skilled in identifying forged documentation, who work with the Rabbinical Courts, will be the sole officials empowered to determine who is Jewish and who is not, said Amar.

Until now many registrars, interested in clearing bottlenecks, augmented the limited manpower supplied by the courts.

In addition to their other duties, the three officials recognized by the rabbinate to authenticate Judaism deal annually with about 4,000 individuals a year who need to prove they are Jews.

A couple is not allowed to register to marry more than three months before the wedding date. The process of authenticating Judaism begins after registering. In cases of serious delays, weddings could in theory be cancelled. In order to prevent this registrars often took it upon themselves to authenticate Judaism.

An Amar spokesman said that halting the involvement of registrars in authenticating Judaism would not cause delays.

"Rabbi Amar made it top priority in order to prevent delays," said the spokesman.

However, Rabbi Dr. Seth Farber, head of ITIM, a nonprofit organization that helps Israelis navigate the bureaucracies of the Israeli rabbinate, expected delays to increase.

"I don't know how the process could conceivable be more efficient with fewer people dealing with it," said Farber. "I think Rabbi Amar's announcement is a very positive development, because it is important that only experts handle Judaism authentication. But right now the reality is that there are 4,000 files and only two or three people handling them."

Farber, a historian of American Jews, said many Jews from western countries would also be affected.

"Since the issue of immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia is so pressing, there has been no critical thinking about immigration from western countries."

According to Farber of the 70,000 young Jews who came to Israel as part of Birthright between 65percent and 70% would have difficultly proving they are Jewish.

In 1935 71% of American Jews were connected with Orthodox institutions, in 1970 this number fell to just 11%.

Rabbi Ratzon Arussi, chairman of the rabbinate's marriage council, said one of the best ways of improving efficiency and reducing delays is by strengthening contact with rabbis in Eastern Europe.

"It is much easier for a rabbi living in the FSU to verify documents than it is for one of our investigators," said Arussi.

"We are doing are best to improve religious services without compromising the dictates of Orthodoxy."

 

But, if you want to Prove you are Christian, STAND FIRM in Testimony of the ONLY LIVING god against these Vipers of HELL who love to be called by men "Rabbi"

____

The ger Toshav, obedient goyim Catholico's  will continue the Pontifex Maximas tradition

http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/spages/546157.html

Cardinals meet with Jewish leaders

By The Associated Press

 

NEW YORK - With Pope John Paul II more frail than ever, Roman Catholic

cardinals and bishops from around the world told a conference of Jewish leaders Monday that the Vatican's unprecedented outreach to Jews over the last several decades will continue.

Opening their meeting with a prayer for the pope's recovery, church leaders affirmed declarations of the Second Vatican Council that transformed Catholic thinking about Jews, including the rejection of any collective Jewish responsibility for the death of Christ.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of that document Nostra Aetate, or "In Our Age," which laid out the church's teaching on Judaism.

"That which happened during the passion of Christ cannot be blamed on the Jews of the time and certainly not on the Jews of today," said Brazilian Cardinal Claudio Hummes, addressing about 100 people at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, a Holocaust museum in Manhattan.

Lk:13:35: Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.



"We must be very careful in our catechism and our teaching not to teach in any way an interpretation of the Gospel that can stimulate anti-Semitism," Hummes said through a translator.

John Paul is credited by many with doing more than any other pontiff to reach out to Jews. He was the first to visit a synagogue, he prayed at Judaism's holiest site - the Western Wall - and he repeatedly condemned anti-Jewish prejudice as sinful.

Complete apostasy and anti-CHRIST for not one stone was left upon another

 


Jewish leaders have become anxious about who will succeed John Paul and have been reaching our to his possible successors. Hummes and Belgian Cardinal Godfried Danneels were among the cardinals at the symposium who have been mentioned as potential candidates.

but RE would be the perfect shembolic False prophet to the false King Moshiach, that son of perdition

The meeting was organized by the World Jewish Congress, which represents
Jewish communities in more than 80 countries and is perhaps best known for compelling governments, banks and corporations to pay billions of dollars to settle Holocaust-related claims.

Also among attendees were Cardinal Walter Kasper, who leads the Vatican's office for relations with Jews, and French Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger, a confidant of John Paul's and a Jewish convert.

Church leaders at the meeting said they were encouraged that John Paul
appeared Sunday at the window of his hospital room, and agreed that despite his increasing infirmity they did not expect him to resign.

Danneels said he spoke with John Paul a few weeks ago, and the pope "has very clear, lucid judgment at the moment."

"He should not be obliged to step down," Danneels said.

Cardinal Angelo Scola of Venice said the pope's perseverance gave the world "a vision of Christian" teaching that "life is important, not only because of usefulness."

"Suffering is a strong part of this attitude," he said.

Vatican officials have built relations with Jews worldwide through many interfaith meetings, inter-religious committees and visits to Israel. Most of the rabbis and Jewish community leaders at this week's event are affiliated with Orthodox Judaism. 

and the rib-eyes and the "Holy Furher have gotten to gether and bemused the world

Matthew 23

1: Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples

2: Saying, The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses' seat:

Sanhedrin
3: All therefore whatsoever they bid you
observe, that observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not.

But if you are ashemed of Jesus the Christ you will lose your soul


4: For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.

Universal Noahide Laws


5: But all their works they do for to be seen of men: they make broad their phylacteries, and enlarge the borders of their garments,
6: And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the
chief seats in the synagogues,
7: And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men,
Rabbi, Rabbi.
8:
But be not ye called Rabbi: for one is your Master, even Christ; and all ye are brethren.
9: And call
no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.

 

and Popus Dopus is not the Holy Father, but an apostate which was not set up by the LORD, but of Sime-ON Magus sent by the Pharisees

 

 

Kasper said the Vatican has regular contact with Orthodox Jews in Israel but has had fewer discussions with the Orthodox in the United States, so these meetings are encouraging.

Rabbi Israel Singer, chairman of the World Jewish Congress, noted that some Orthodox had resisted interfaith dialogue out of concern that it was more of a "public relations exercise" than a true commitment to resolve differences.

He credited John Paul with allaying those fears. "The pope has opened the door to all faiths," he said

and all the daughters return to the mother HARLOT

___

http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r210_35.pdf

And all of it Just in time for.......MORE TREASON ha Noahide

Army Regulation 210–35

Installations

Civilian Inmate

Labor Program

Headquarters

Department of the Army

Washington, DC

14 January 2005

UNCLASSIFIED

 

SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 210–35

Civilian Inmate Labor Program

This rapid action revision dated 14 January 2005--

o Assigns responsibilities to Headquarters, Installation Management Agency

(para 1-4j).

o Makes administrative and editorial changes (throughout).

This new regulation dated 9 December 1997

o Provides Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor

programs and civilian prison camps on Army installations.

o Discusses sources of Federal and State civilian inmate labor.

 

Headquarters

Department of the Army

Washington, DC

14 January 2005

Installations

Civilian Inmate Labor Program

*Army Regulation 210–35

Effective 14 February 2005

History. This publication is a rapid action

r e v i s i o n . T h e p o r t i o n s a f f e c t e d b y t h i s

r a p i d a c t i o n r e v i s i o n a r e l i s t e d i n t h e

summary of change.

S u m m a r y . T h i s r e g u l a t i o n p r o v i d e s

guidance for establishing and managing

civilian inmate labor programs on Army

installations. It provides guidance on es-

tablishing prison camps on Army installa-

t i o n s . I t a d d r e s s e s r e c o r d k e e p i n g a n d

reporting incidents related to the Civilian

Inmate Labor Program and/or prison camp

administration.

Applicability. This regulation applies to

t h e A c t i v e A r m y , t h e A r m y N a t i o n a l

Guard of the United States, and the U.S.

A r m y R e s e r v e u n l e s s o t h e r w i s e s t a t e d .

During mobilization, the Assistant Chief

of Staff for Installation Management may

modify chapters and policies contained in

this regulation.

Proponent and exception authority.

The proponent of this regulation is the

Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation

Management. The proponent has the au-

thority to approve exceptions or waivers

to this regulation that are consistent with

controlling law and regulations. The pro-

ponent may delegate this approval author-

ity, in writing, to a division chief within

the proponent agency or a direct reporting

unit or field operating agency of the pro-

ponent agency in the grade of colonel or

the civilian equivalent. Activities may re-

quest a waiver to this regulation by pro-

v i d i n g j u s t i f i c a t i o n t h a t i n c l u d e s a f u l l

analysis of the expected benefits and must

i n c l u d e f o r m a l r e v i e w b y t h e a c t i v i t y ’ s

senior legal officer. All waiver requests

will be endorsed by the commander or

s e n i o r l e a d e r o f t h e r e q u e s t i n g a c t i v i t y

and forwarded through their higher head-

quarters to the policy proponent. Refer to

AR 25–30 for specific guidance.

Army management control process.

This regulation contains management con-

trol provisions and identifies key manage-

ment controls that must be evaluated.

S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n . S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n o f

this regulation and establishment of com-

mand and local forms are prohibited with-

out prior approval from Assistant Chief of

S t a f f f o r I n s t a l l a t i o n M a n a g e m e n t

(DAIM–ZA), 600 Army Pentagon, Wash-

ington, DC 20310–0600.

Suggested improvements. Users are

invited to send comments and suggested

improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recom-

m e n d e d C h a n g e s t o P u b l i c a t i o n s a n d

Blank Forms) directly to Assistant Chief

o f S t a f f f o r I n s t a l l a t i o n M a n a g e m e n t

(DAIM–MD), 600 Army Pentagon, Wash-

ington, DC 20310–0600.

Distribution. This publication is availa-

ble in electronic media only and is in-

tended for command levels A, B, C, D,

and E for the Active Army, Army Na-

tional Guard of the United States, and the

U.S. Army Reserve.

Contents

(Listed by paragraph and page number)

Chapter 1

Introduction, page 1

Purpose • 1–1, page 1

References • 1–2, page 1

Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3, page 1

Responsibilities • 1–4, page 1

Civilian inmate labor programs • 1–5, page 2

The process • 1–6, page 2

Chapter 2

Establishing Installation Civilian Inmate Labor Programs, page 4

Policy statement • 2–1, page 4

*This regulation supersedes AR 210–35, dated 9 December 1997.

AR 210–35 • 14 January 2005

i

UNCLASSIFIED

 

Contents—Continued

Negotiating with corrections systems representatives • 2–2, page 4

Governing provisions • 2–3, page 4

Procedures for establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs • 2–4, page 7

Chapter 3

Establishing Civilian Inmate Prison Camps on Army Installations, page 8

Policy statement • 3–1, page 8

Negotiating with correctional systems representatives to establish prison camps • 3–2, page 8

Governing criteria civilian inmate prison camps • 3–3, page 8

Governing provisions for operating civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations • 3–4, page 9

Procedures for establishing a civilian inmate prison camp on Army installations • 3–5, page 9

Interservice, interagency, or interdepartmental support agreements • 3–6, page 10

Chapter 4

Reporting and Recordkeeping, page 10

Incident reports • 4–1, page 10

Media coverage • 4–2, page 10

Recordkeeping • 4–3, page 11

Appendixes

A. References, page 12

B. Memorandum of Agreement Format, page 13

C. Sample Inmate Labor Plan, page 19

D. Management Control Evaluation Checklist, page 23

E. 18 USC 4125(A), and Executive Order 11755, page 23

Figure List

Figure 1–1: Civilian Inmate Labor Program process, page 3

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement, page 14

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 15

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 16

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 17

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 18

Figure B–1: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 19

Figure C–1: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 20

Figure C–1: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 21

Figure C–1: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 22

Glossary

Index

ii

AR 210–35 • 14 January 2005

 

Chapter 1

Introduction

1–1. Purpose

This regulation provides Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian prison

camps on Army installations. Sources of civilian inmate labor are limited to on– and off–post Federal corrections

facilities, State and/or local corrections facilities operating from on–post prison camps pursuant to leases under Section

2667, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 2667), and off–post State corrections facilities participating in the

demonstration project authorized under Section 1065, Public Law (PL) 103–337. Otherwise, State and/or local inmate

labor from off–post corrections facilities is currently excluded from this program.

1–2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.

1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

1–4. Responsibilities

a. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations and Environment) (ASA(I&E)) will—

(1) Provide policy guidance and resolve policy issues.

(2) Provide overall program direction.

(3) Serve as approval authority for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison camps on

Army installations.

(4) Provide procedural guidance on real property acquisition, management, and disposal relating to establishing

prison camps on Army installations.

b. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA(FM&C)) will—

(1) Provide reimbursement policy guidance on interservice, interagency, and/or interdepartmental support agree-

ments between installations and corrections facilities to establish civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations.

(2) Provide reimbursement policy for civilian inmate labor utilization, other than reimbursement for inmate labor

itself.

(3) Review all actions pertaining to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program for compliance with Army financial

management guidance.

c. The Chief of Public Affairs will—

(1) Monitor media coverage on installation civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison camps on

Army installations.

(2) Coordinate all proposed media coverage of potential national interest concerning the Army Civilian Inmate

Labor Program and civilian inmate prison camps with the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management

(ACSIM) prior to release.

d. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA(M&RA)) will—

(1) Provide policy guidance on inmate labor utilization issues pertaining to existing in–house resources.

(2) Provide policy guidance and procedures for apprising installation government employee labor unions of propos-

als to use civilian inmate labor and, for existing installation civilian inmate labor programs, apprising these unions of

changes in agreements with corrections facilities governing inmate use.

e. The Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management will—

(1) Execute the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program.

(2) Develop and implement policy and procedures for using civilian inmate labor and establishing civilian inmate

prison camps on Army installations.

(3) Serve as the focal point for staff coordination on issues pertaining to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program and/or

civilian inmate prison camps.

(4) Conduct a program review in accordance with AR 11–2 once every 5 years.

(5) Provide policy guidance on functions for which civilian inmate labor can be used.

(6) Review reports of availability pertaining to granting the use of Army real property.

(7) Immediately inform the Chief, Legislative Liaison of approval of civilian inmate labor programs and civilian

inmate prison camps on Army installations to facilitate notification to interested members of Congress.

All who are TREASONOUS VIPER who should be the very first Pool

f. The General Counsel and the Judge Advocate General will review all actions pertaining to the Civilian Inmate

Labor Program and civilian inmate prison camps for compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Such as HJR 104, PL 102-14 ?

 

g. The Chief of Engineers will, in those cases involving use of Army real property, handle all matters pertaining to

granting the use of Army real property.

h. The Provost Marshal General will—

1

AR 210–35 • 14 January 2005

 

(1) Monitor reporting of serious incidents, that is, walkaways, escapes, riots, disturbances, and any criminal activity

by civilian inmates occurring on the installation under AR 190–40.

(2) Provide policy on law enforcement operations on Army installations.

i. Heads of other Army Staff and Army Secretariat agencies will provide advice, as necessary, on aspects of the

Civilian Inmate Labor Program within their functional areas of responsibility.

Bush has made himself a ready made Labor Force Via Homelandt "Say" Kurity Patriot AKT II unto the Moshiach ben satan, the head Nasi

 

j. The Director, Headquarters, Installation Management Agency (HQ, IMA) will—

(1) Ensure that their installations participating in civilian inmate labor programs comply with 18 USC 4125(a) and

other applicable laws governing civilian inmate labor, Executive Order (EO) 11755, and all provisions of this

regulation.

(2) Review and endorse installation memoranda of agreement (MOA) and Inmate Labor Plans to establish civilian

inmate labor programs and proposals to establish civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations, and forward such

MOA, plans and proposals to Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) for approval.

(3) Review and endorse installation requests for changes to Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program policy.

(4) Annually review installation civilian inmate labor programs against the key management controls listed in

appendix D.

k. Installation commanders will—

(1) Comply with 18 USC 4125(a) and other applicable laws governing civilian inmate labor, EO 11755, and all

provisions of this regulation.

(2) Submit the following through command channels to Headquarters, Installation Management Activity (SFIM–PL),

2511 Jefferson Davis Highway, Taylor Building, Arlington, VA 22202–3926:

(a) Memoranda of agreement and Inmate Labor Plans to establish civilian inmate labor programs.

(b) Proposals to establish civilian inmate prison camps.

(c) Written notification of termination of civilian inmate labor programs.

(d) Revisions to existing memoranda of agreement requiring changes to Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program

policy.

(e) Requests for guidance on any Civilian Inmate Labor Program situation that is not addressed in this regulation.

Guillotines and decapitations?

(3) Annually review their civilian inmate labor programs to determine if their programs continue to generate cost

avoidance.

(4) Annually review their civilian inmate labor programs against the key management controls identified in appen-

dix D.

(5) Report all contacts with State or local corrections system on possible use of civilian inmate labor, facilities, land,

or installation through command channels to Headquarters, Installation Management Activity (SFIM–PL), 2511 Jeffer-

son Davis Highway, Taylor Building, Arlington, VA 22202–3926.

1–5. Civilian inmate labor programs

a. Civilian inmate labor programs benefit both the Army and corrections systems by—

(1) Providing a source of labor at no direct labor cost to Army installations to accomplish tasks that would not be

possible otherwise due to the manning and funding constraints under which the Army operates.

(2) Providing meaningful work for inmates and, in some cases, additional space to alleviate overcrowding in nearby

corrections facilities.

(3) Making cost–effective use of buildings and land not otherwise being used.

b. Except for the 3 exceptions listed in paragraph 2–1d below, installation civilian inmate labor programs may use

civilian inmate labor only from Federal corrections facilities located either off or on the installation.

c. Keys to operating an effective civilian inmate labor program on Army installations include—

(1) Establishing a comprehensive lease agreement, interservice, interagency, and/or interdepartmental support agree-

ment (ISA), and/or memoranda of agreement with the corrections facility.

(2) Developing a cooperative working relationship between installation personnel and corrections facility personnel.

(3) Working closely with installation government employee labor unions to ensure union leaders understand the

program and have current information on program status.

Abu Ghraib? Gunatanomo?

(4) Training all installation personnel involved in the operation or administration of the program frequently.

(5) Developing a public affairs plan informing the installation and the surrounding local community of the program

and work projects assigned to civilian inmate labor.

1–6. The process

Figure 1–1 diagrams the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program process. The flowchart reads top down and left to right,

starting with the decision to establish both a prison camp and an inmate labor program (the diamond–shaped box in the

upper left corner of the diagram labeled "prison camp inmate labor?"). The diamond–shaped boxes are decision nodes;

the rectangular boxes are steps in the process to establish a civilian inmate labor program, establish a civilian inmate

2

AR 210–35 • 14 January 2005

 

prison camp on post, or do both. Follow the arrows through the flowchart. Chapters 2 and 3 address procedures for

establishing a civilian inmate labor program and/or on–post civilian inmate prison camp.

Figure 1–1. Civilian Inmate Labor Program process

3

AR 210–35 • 14 January 2005

 

Chapter 2

Establishing Installation Civilian Inmate Labor Programs

2–1. Policy statement

a. With a few exceptions, the Army’s Civilian Inmate Labor Program is currently limited to using inmates from

facilities under the control of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP). Section 4125(a), Title 18, United States Code

allows the Attorney General to make available to other Federal agencies the services of Federal inmates and defines the

types of services inmates can perform. 

How about the ISREALHELLI Prisons which are independently being purchased across the US

 

The FBOP provides civilian inmate labor free of charge to the Army.

b. The Army is not interested in, nor can afford, any relationship with a corrections facility if that relationship

stipulates payment for civilian inmate labor. Installation civilian inmate labor program operating costs must not exceed

the cost avoidance generated from using inmate labor (see para 4–3 for a discussion of cost avoidance).

READY made Labor is the non-Goyim Noahides

 

c. Guidelines in this regulation for establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs pertain to negotiating with

Federal corrections facilities only. Currently, there is no overarching law that addresses establishing State and/or local

civilian inmate labor programs on Department of Defense (DOD) military facilities when these programs use inmates

from off–post corrections facilities.

d. However, there are 3 exceptions to using State or local civilian inmate labor from off–post corrections facilities—

(1) Section 1065, PL 103–337, allows the Army to conduct a demonstration project. This demonstration project tests

the feasibility of providing prerelease employment training to nonviolent offenders in a State corrections facility. The

demonstration project is limited to 3 Army installations. The 3 Army installations participating in the demonstration

project may use inmates from an off–post State corrections facility.

(2) Army National Guard units leasing facilities from the Army or occupying State–owned land or facilities may use

inmates from an off–post State and/or local corrections facility.

(3) The prohibition against use of State and/or local civilian inmate labor from off–post corrections facilities does

not apply to Civil Works projects where the Army has statutory authority to accept voluntary contributions in the form

of services from State or local governments. If contributed, inmate services are combined with materials or services

paid for with Federally appropriated funds; the use of civilian inmate labor must also comply with the provisions of EO

11755. The use of civilian inmate labor under these exceptions must still comply with the requirements of this

regulation.

e. Installation commanders must address, in memoranda of agreement with the corrections facilities, all items in the

governing provisions (para 2–3 below).

f. Section 4125(a), Title 18, United States Code and EO 11755 are incorporated into this regulation at appendix E.

2–2. Negotiating with corrections systems representatives

Installation commanders may initiate discussions with FBOP representatives concerning use of civilian inmate labor on

Army installations, subject to the governing provisions listed in paragraph 2–3. Installation commanders are not

authorized to negotiate with representatives of State or local corrections systems or governmental agencies regarding

civilian inmate labor from off–post corrections facilities (see para 3–2).

2–3. Governing provisions

The following provisions govern the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program and must be reflected in agreements with

corrections facilities concerning the use of civilian inmate labor on Army installations:

a. No use of land or facilities. No use of land or facilities on installations is involved in executing civilian inmate

labor programs, except for designated work, latrine, eating, and vending areas.

(1) Installation commanders will establish areas where inmates are prohibited from entering, and any other restric-

tions that are deemed necessary. These areas will be outlined in the memoranda of agreement between the installation

and the corrections facility. The intent is to preclude fraternization between inmates and civilians, military personnel

and/or, family members and to ensure their safety at all times. Army policy on prohibited areas is to restrict inmates to

the on–post civilian inmate prison camp (where applicable), work areas, latrines, and vending machine areas.

(2) Inmates will not enter or work in or near family housing areas at any time.

(3) Inmates will not work in day care centers, youth services and/or school–age service centers, schools, recreation

centers, and/or libraries, or similar facilities, except when these facilities are closed to the public, or when the

likelihood of inmate contact with the general military community or family members is remote.

(4) Inmates will not work in areas where medical supplies (drugs, syringes, and so forth) are stored unless the

medical supplies are secured and the inmates are under constant view by Army personnel.

(5) Inmates will not work in areas where firearms and/or ammunition are sold or stored, nor in areas where

alcoholic beverages are sold, stored, or served.

b. Nominal costs. The program must be without direct labor cost (for inmate labor itself) or expense to the

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Department of the Army except for nominal costs for equipment, materials, and supplies used in inmate labor details,

program administration, telephone calls to corrections facilities, lunch time meals, transporting inmates to and from

corrections facilities, and other similar costs addressed in paragraph 4–3, below. Inmates participating in the program

will not be recompensed from Department of Army appropriated or nonappropriated funds.

(1) Inmates are not Department of the Army employees and are not regarded as such. Inmates must not be referred

to as employees. They will not be paid from Department of the Army funds, nor receive any personal or private

gratuity for work accomplished or services rendered. Interservice, interagency, or interdepartmental support agreements

and/or memoranda of agreement with the corrections facility must not create any appearance of employment of

inmates.

(2) Installation commanders have authority to determine and absorb nominal costs associated with their civilian

inmate labor programs. Nominal costs are minor costs incidental to civilian inmate labor program operations. Nominal

costs may be costs for equipment, materials, and supplies used in inmate labor details, program administration,

telephone calls to corrections facilities, lunch time meals, transporting inmates to and from corrections facilities, and

other similar costs addressed in paragraph 4–3, below. Installations may absorb nominal costs associated with their

program on a nonreimbursable basis. However, installation commanders will not reimburse the corrections facility for

inmate labor, either as payment of funds or establishing credits in memoranda of agreement or ISAs as payment for

inmate labor.

(3) Inmates are not allowed to operate Army vehicles or equipment unless they possess the necessary valid

operator’s licenses, have been given proper training in vehicle operation and safety by Army personnel in accordance

with AR 600–55, and are authorized to operate the vehicle or equipment by both the installation and the corrections

facility.

(4) Operation of Army vehicles by inmates is permitted only when absolutely necessary for completion of work.

Inmates will not be permitted to operate vehicles unless in a secured area or under direct observation of installation or

corrections facility personnel. Training to operate Army unique vehicles and/or equipment should be provided by the

Army.

(5) No personal vehicles will be used to transport inmates to and/or from corrections facilities, or to and/or from

work sites.

(6) Enforcement of inventory, control, issuance, and return of hand tools and equipment provided for inmate labor

details must be controlled by installation plans and/or standing procedures.

c. Services provided to installations. Services provided to the installation must be in accordance with 18 USC

4125(a). Such services are constructing or repairing roads; clearing, maintaining, or reforesting public land; building

levees; or constructing or repairing any other public way or works financed wholly or in major part by funds

a p p r o p r i a t e d b y C o n g r e s s . I n m a t e s m a y p e r f o r m c u s t o d i a l t a s k s , b u i l di n g d e m o l i t i o n , d e b r i s r e m o v a l , m o w i n g ,

landscaping, painting, carpentry, trash pickup, transporting debris to and from recycling centers, and other similar

activities. No other services are allowed by law.

d. Work performed. Work performed by inmates will not interfere nor conflict with approved projects for which

resources have been allocated and funds made available for performance by contract or Army civilian labor force, or

with work which can be accomplished within authorized personnel ceilings. The Civilian Inmate Labor Program was

created to provide installation commanders with an alternate labor source to perform valid requirements. Civilian

inmate labor does not compete with existing in–house or contractor resources.

e. Participants. Only inmates classified as minimum level security will participate in the Civilian Inmate Labor

Program. Minimum level security inmates do not need constant guard. Corrections facilities will be responsible for

ensuring that only minimum level security inmates participate in the inmate labor program and for selecting inmate

participants.

(1) Memoranda of agreement with the corrections facility will state that the installation commander will direct the

removal of any inmate deemed undesirable or detrimental in any way to the mission, soldiers, family members, or

civilian employees of the installation.

(2) Under no circumstances will the following types of inmates be permitted in the Civilian Inmate Labor Program:

(a) A person in whom there is a significant public interest as determined by the corrections facility superintendent in

coordination with the installation commander.

(b) A person who has been a significant management problem in their current corrections facility or in another

facility.

(c) A principal organized crime figure.

(d) An inmate convicted of a sex offense or whose criminal history includes such conduct.

(e) An inmate convicted of a violent crime or whose criminal history includes such conduct.

(f) An inmate convicted of the sale or intent to distribute illegal drugs who held a leadership position in any drug

conspiracy, or has been involved with drugs within the last 3 years while in prison.

(g) An escape risk.

(h) An inmate who poses a threat to the general public as determined by the corrections facility superintendent in

coordination with the installation commander.

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(i) An inmate declared or found insane or mentally incompetent by a court, administrative proceeding, or physician,

or under treatment for a mental disease or disorder.

(j) An inmate convicted of arson.

(k) A Federal inmate convicted while on active duty, presently serving a sentence for that conviction.

f. Army personnel. Department of the Army personnel will not be involved with custodial aspects of inmate labor

details.

(a) The Warden and/or Administrator of the local corrections facility is charged with the responsibility and

accountability for the control and custody of inmates on labor details at all times. Any use of Army military or civilian

personnel to guard, control, discipline, or otherwise exercise custodial supervision is prohibited.

(b) Army military or civilian personnel may oversee the work to be performed by inmates or inmate labor details.

Oversight is defined as telling inmates what they must do by specifying work to be accomplished. This oversight

includes training inmates in performing assigned work, using special equipment, and safety precautions. Oversight also

includes showing inmates the location of the work site and performing quality assurance inspections of inmate work to

determine if the work performed meets quality, quantity, and timeliness specifications. Oversight may also include

requiring inmates to sign time cards at intervals established by the Warden and/or Administrator of the local

corrections facility. If an inmate cannot be located to sign a time card or is otherwise found missing from an assigned

work area, Army personnel will immediately notify the local corrections facility point of contact staff supervisor and

the installation military police.

g. Property damage. Generally, any interference with or damage to property under control of the Department of the

Army, incident to the execution of inmate labor details, will be promptly corrected by the corrections facility as

directed by the installation commander. However, the installation commander has the prerogative to decide first to

thoroughly investigate the incident prior to directing the corrections facility to correct the situation; if the installation

commander opts to first investigate the incident, both Army and corrections facility personnel will participate in the

investigation. If it is determined that the damage or interference resulting in a loss was caused by an inmate or

corrections personnel, both the installation commander and the corrections facility superintendent will be briefed on the

findings, and the installation commander may—

(1) Request the corrections facility to promptly correct the situation.

(2) Direct that the inmate and/or corrections personnel be removed from the installation.

(3) Direct that the program with the corrections facility be discontinued.

(4) Decide on any combination of these options. This does not include damages, breakage, or breakdowns occurring

to equipment or other property due to normal use, or poor and/or unsafe operational condition.

(a) All memoranda of agreement with the corrections facility must contain a clause addressing how property damage

and/or interference will be redressed. An example of this clause is included at appendix B, paragraph 5e. The

aforementioned clause has been used successfully in memoranda of agreement with the FBOP. It is offered as

suggested terminology. There is no specific requirement that the corrections facility be held automatically responsible

for any loss or damage; this should be resolved on a case by case basis by the installation commander.

(b) Investigations may be conducted through AR 15–6 procedures or a report of survey.

h. Operation. The Civilian Inmate Labor Program will operate in such a manner that it will not interfere with the

operation and/or mission of the installation as determined by the installation commander.

i. Safety. Inmate accident compensation procedures set forth at Section 301, Title 28, Code of Federal Regulations

(28 CFR 301) apply to all work performed by FBOP inmates. However, installation commanders should check with

their legal advisor to determine potential liability for injuries, accidents, or deaths caused by FBOP inmates or

corrections facility personnel.

(1) Corrections facilities have their own safety program and will generally provide safety training to all civilian

inmates participating in the inmate labor program. Installations may provide safety equipment; for example, shoes,

goggles, hard hats, and so forth or negotiate this with the corrections facility. Installations providing this equipment

will ensure that the equipment is in safe and serviceable condition.

(2) Installation personnel will provide safety training to inmates and inmate labor details and corrections facility

personnel specific to the type of work being performed. Such safety training will also cover accident and/or hazardous

working conditions reporting. Installations should provide any required special protective equipment, materials, tools,

and supplies in safe and serviceable condition.

(3) Inmate training must include safety instruction as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration

(OSHA) in 29 CFR 1910 which establishes specific training requirements and places the responsibility for such safety

training on the employer (the corrections facility). Inmates will report for work details with this OSHA required

training already completed.

(4) Inmates will not be assigned work which is inherently dangerous, or of high risk; for example, hazardous

materials cleanup, firefighting, and so forth.

j. Emergency medical care. The Army will provide emergency medical care and first aid. In the event of an on–post

life threatening situation, the local military hospital will respond with emergency medical service, or the installation

will provide transportation to the nearest available hospital. The corrections facility will be promptly notified of such

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medical emergencies and/or serious illnesses. The corrections facility will reimburse the Army for all emergency care

costs incurred on behalf of the civilian inmates and/or corrections facility personnel. The corrections facility will

provide routine medical care for civilian inmates.

k. Security. The corrections facility retains control and custody of the civilian inmates at all times. In addition to

defining areas off limits to inmates, installations should consult with and incorporate corrections facility security

requirements into their memoranda of agreement. For example, the FBOP does not allow inmates to have access to or

use installation phone lines, fax machines, computers and/or computer systems, nor to accept a gratuity of any kind at

any time. Also, inmates will not be used in areas where classified information, personnel records, medical records, or

other confidential or sensitive data is discussed or is in plain view. Inmates working in areas where such information is

locked or secured will be under constant view by Army personnel.

l. Training of Army personnel. The corrections facility will provide training and indoctrination to all Army personnel

who will oversee inmate work. Training will cover inmate discipline, staff conduct, inmate accountability, and

corrections facility safety program. This training is mandatory. This training will be provided at no cost to the Army

and at least on an annual basis.

m. Public affairs. Installations will develop a public affairs plan that informs the installation and the surrounding

local community of the program and work projects assigned to civilian inmate labor. This will largely mitigate

potential negative repercussions from using and having inmates present on the installation. Press releases involving

inmates will be issued only by the corrections facility, in coordination with the installation public affairs office, as

corrections facility officials are responsible for protecting the privacy and other rights of inmates. Press releases

regarding the civilian inmate labor program should be coordinated with the corrections facility superintendent. One

copy of the press release will be routed through command channels to HQDA, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation

Management, Plans and Operations Division (DAIMMD), and HQDA, Office of the Chief of Public Affairs, Public

Communications Division (SAPAPCD). Press releases do not require HQDA approval prior to release.

(1) Media representatives should not be allowed to interview inmates nor take photographs of inmates without the

corrections facility’s and installation public affairs office specific approval.

(2) Requests for interviews or photographs of inmates should be referred to the corrections facility superintendent

and the installation public affairs office.

2–4. Procedures for establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs

Procedures for establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs apply to both off–post corrections facilities and

on–post civilian inmate prison camps.

a. Upon finalizing negotiations with the corrections facility, the installation commander and corrections facility

superintendent will prepare a proposed memorandum of agreement, using the format at appendix B, covering all

aspects of the Civilian Inmate Labor Program under consideration. This agreement will include, but is not limited to,

the governing provisions in paragraph 2–3, above. In addition, the memoranda of agreement must include provisions

for reporting serious incidents and negative media coverage, addressed in paragraphs 4–1 and 4–2, and the projected

cost avoidance from using civilian inmates addressed in paragraph 4–3, below.

b. Installations will prepare an Inmate Labor Plan governing administration and operation of the inmate labor

program on the installation. This plan will include, but is not limited to, procedures for assigning inmate labor details,

oversight and/or monitoring responsibilities, procedures for requesting inmate labor details, training of personnel

involved with the program, required security and/or safety measures, environmental considerations, and any installation

reporting requirements. Inmate Labor Plan format is determined locally.

c. Memoranda of agreement and/or Inmate Labor Plans will be reviewed as needed by the installation commander

and corrections facility superintendent to incorporate changes in Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program policy and other

factors affecting the terms and conditions of these documents.

d. The installation Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) will review the memoranda of agreement and Inmate Labor Plan for

legal sufficiency and to ensure that inmates will not be performing functions contrary to law. Other installation

functional proponents will review the memoranda of agreement and Inmate Labor Plan from a functional perspective.

e. Installation civilian personnel offices will inform installation Government employee labor unions of proposals to

use civilian inmates and comply with any bargaining obligation under 5 USC 7101 et. seq. (Federal Labor Management

Relations Statute).

f. Requests to establish civilian inmate labor programs will be submitted through command channels to Headquar-

ters, Installation Management Activity (SFIM–PL), 2511 Jefferson Davis Highway, Taylor Building, Arlington, VA

22202–3926. Requests must include HQ, IMA endorsement and copies of the proposed memoranda of agreement and

Inmate Labor Plan. The HQ, IMA endorsement includes an SJA review of the memoranda of agreement and Inmate

Labor Plan for legal sufficiency. Other HQ, IMA functional proponents will review the memoranda of agreement and

Inmate Labor Plan from a functional perspective.

g. Installations will not implement civilian inmate labor programs, nor incorporate revisions to existing memoranda

of agreement and/or Inmate Labor Plans requiring changes to Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program policy without

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HQDA approval. Appendix B contains the format for installation memoranda of agreement; appendix C contains a

sample Inmate Labor Plan.

Chapter 3

Establishing Civilian Inmate Prison Camps on Army Installations

3–1. Policy statement

It is not Army policy to solicit offers from correctional systems to establish civilian inmate prison camps on Army

installations. Nevertheless, the Army recognizes that these correctional systems may approach installations to lease land

on which to build corrections facilities, or to lease unoccupied facilities. The Army will evaluate requests to establish

civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations on a case by case basis. These prison camps will house minimum

and low security inmates, as determined by the correctional systems. However, the Army’s primary purpose for

allowing establishment of prison camps on Army installations is to use the resident nonviolent civilian inmate labor

pool to work on the leased portions of the installation.

3–2. Negotiating with correctional systems representatives to establish prison camps

Installation commanders will not initiate formal discussions with correctional systems representatives to establish

civilian inmate prison camps on their installations. Installation commanders are not authorized to negotiate with these

representatives without first obtaining HQDA approval to proceed. Once approval is granted, installation commanders

may enter into negotiations, subject to the provisions of this chapter.

a. Establishing civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations is separate from establishing civilian inmate labor

programs, as discussed in chapter 2 above. Establishing civilian inmate prison camps does not automatically institute a

civilian inmate labor program. Procedures for establishing civilian inmate labor programs, incident to establishing

civilian inmate prison camps, still apply.

b. As noted in paragraph 2–1, above, civilian inmate labor programs are limited to use of inmates under the control

of the FBOP. Accordingly, establishment of a State civilian inmate prison camp under a lease pursuant to 10 USC

2667 does not permit the creation of a civilian inmate labor program.

c. Section 1342, Title 31, United States Code precludes the United States Government from accepting voluntary

services unless specifically allowed by statute. The Army has determined that accepting inmate labor with no

associated cost for inmate labor is equivalent to accepting voluntary services from corrections facilities. This precludes

using State and local civilian inmates from off–post corrections facilities. However, inmate labor programs using State

and local civilian inmates from on–post prison camps is allowed. Section 2667, Title 10, United States Code governing

leases of DOD property allows acceptance of inmate labor as payment in kind for real property leased to correctional

systems for use as prison camps in an amount equivalent to the fair market value of the lease interest; however, such

labor is limited to maintenance, protection, repair, improvement, and restoration activities on the leased facilities.

3–3. Governing criteria civilian inmate prison camps

The following criteria apply to establishing civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations:

a. Since the correctional system has full responsibility and authority over the use and occupation of the civilian

inmate prison camp, all claims for property damage or personal injury arising therein are the responsibility of the

correctional system, not the Army.

b. The installation commander and HQ, IMA must assess the impacts that the prison and prison population will have

on the installation, military mission, and installation population. At a minimum, the installation commander must

consider mission security, possible impacts on military families living on–post, and community concerns.

c. Prison facility sites should be separated from the general installation population to the maximum extent possible.

At a minimum, prison facilities should not be located in close proximity to family housing, dormitories, or community

support facilities.

d. Prison facilities should not be located in close proximity to critical mission areas where surveillance of activities

could become a source of intelligence data.

e. Location of prison facilities should be in keeping with the requirements and objectives of installation comprehen-

sive planning concepts and environmental considerations at the individual installation.

f. Civilian inmate prison camps will not be collocated with military confinement facilities.

g. Using installation facilities is acceptable when buildings are scheduled for demolition, or are not needed for

current or programmed mission requirements and can be rehabilitated.

h. The correctional system will provide the primary source of funding for establishing, operating, and maintaining

prison facilities.

i. Support and services provided between the Army installation and a Federal civilian inmate prison camp will be

delineated in a formal ISA in accordance with Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 4000.19. There should be no

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need for any reimbursement policy where State corrections facilities are concerned because the cost of doing business

with a State corrections facility should be factored into the lease agreement.

j. Correctional systems’ use of Army real property will be in accordance with AR 405–80.

k. AR 42041 establishes policy, responsibility, and procedures for acquisition and sale of utility services. A separate

contract form is required for use in the sale of utilities and related services.

3–4. Governing provisions for operating civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations

Civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations are subject to the following provisions:

a. No weapons other than those authorized for the security of the civilian inmate prison camp and public protection

will be permitted on prison camp premises. Storage, possession, control, and use of such weapons will be in

accordance with corrections facility policy and procedures.

b. No alcohol or controlled substances other than those under the control and supervision of the corrections facility

medical personnel will be permitted on civilian inmate prison camp premises. Storage, possession, control, dispensing,

and use of such drugs will be in accordance with corrections facility policy and procedures.

c. The corrections facility must have a comprehensive written security plan; a contingency plan for handling

walkaways, escapes, riots, serious incidents, job actions or strikes, and any other disruption; and a plan designed to

ensure that adequate medical, sanitation, recreational, and other humanitarian services are provided for the inmates

housed at the civilian inmate prison camp. These plans will be made available to the installation commander.

d. Army personnel will not be involved in quelling or suppressing riots, disorders, and similar incidents within

civilian inmate prison camp premises. Military police may not respond to or investigate incidents which occur within

the civilian inmate prison camp and involve inmates or correctional facilities personnel, unless the installation

commander determines that such action is reasonably necessary to protect personnel, equipment, or facilities under his

or her control. They may gather information to fulfill AR 190–40 reporting requirements. Military police may take

immediate action to save life or property or protect a Federal function. They may detain and restrain walkaways,

escapees, and persons who commit a felony or breach of peace in their presence. However, inmates detained by

military police will be turned over to civilian authorities as soon as possible. Military police will continue to perform

military law enforcement duties to maintain good order and discipline on the installation, such as patrolling and

criminal investigation of incidents occurring outside the prison camp, even if these activities indirectly enhance the

camp’s security.

e. Civilian inmate prison camp personnel must request approval from the installation commander before using riot

control agents or deadly force to quell prison riots, disorders, or other incidents.

f. Army personnel will not be involved in any manner with civilian inmate prison camp operations, except as

otherwise specified in paragraph 3–4d, above.

3–5. Procedures for establishing a civilian inmate prison camp on Army installations

The following procedures apply to establishing a civilian inmate prison camp on Army installations. These procedures

are separate from those procedures discussed in chapter 2 above for establishing a civilian inmate labor program.

Installations desiring to both establish a civilian inmate prison camp and an inmate labor program must follow the

procedures outlined in chapters 2 and 3 of this regulation. Establishment of a civilian inmate prison camp does not

automatically establish a civilian inmate labor program. Separate documents must be executed for each action, as

outlined below. However, as noted in paragraph 2–1, above, civilian inmate labor programs are limited to use of

inmates under the control of the FBOP. Establishment of a State civilian inmate prison camp under a lease pursuant to

10 USC 2667 does not permit the creation of a civilian inmate labor program.

a. Installations will submit a proposal to establish a civilian inmate prison camp through command channels to

HQDA, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, Plans and Operations Division (DAIM–MD), 600 Army

Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0600. The proposal must be signed by the installation commander, be endorsed by

the chain of command at all levels, and address the following areas:

(1) Proposed civilian inmate prison campsite, intended use for existing buildings, planned renovations, or new

construction. Include a site drawing of the planned area.

(2) Proposed number of inmates to be housed and security level of inmates.

(3) Proposed number of inmates to be used in work details, if applicable.

(4) Economic analysis of the cost and/or benefits of establishing a civilian inmate prison camp. The analysis must

include all the costs of providing all utility needs, such as water supply, wastewater treatment, stormwater, solid waste

management, electricity, and central steam or hot water. The analysis must also describe the planned method of

reimbursing the Army for these costs and how a transfer of funds from the corrections facility to the Army will be

effected.

(5) Synopsis of the correctional system’s request to establish a civilian inmate prison camp.

(6) Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act,

and any successor legislation.

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(7) Local community reaction, including family member reaction to establishing a civilian inmate prison camp on

the installation.

(8) Summary of the benefits the Army will derive from establishing a civilian inmate prison camp. Address the

services the Army will provide the prison camp and the services the prison camp will provide the Army in return.

However, keep in mind that for State civilian inmate prison camps established pursuant to a lease under 10 USC 2667,

the services that the prison camp may provide to the Army are limited to maintenance, protection, restoration, repair,

and improvement of the leased facilities.

(9) Risk assessment regarding the facilities proposed for outgranting. Address the viability of establishing a civilian

inmate prison camp.

(10) Correctional system security plan for the civilian inmate prison camp.

(11) Proposed length of time of agreements (ISAs and lease and/or permit).

(12) Report of availability of real property and/or facilities proposed for outgranting.

b. Upon receiving HQDA approval, installations may request the Corps of Engineers district office to proceed with

preparing the appropriate outgrant document with the correctional system for the right to use Army real property and

facilities, and, for Federal civilian inmate prison camps, prepare a permit and an ISA delineating the services to be

rendered by the civilian inmate prison camp and the support required from the installation. One copy of the outgrant

document and the ISA, where applicable, will be forwarded through command channels to HQ, IMA (SFIM–PL).

c. For Federal civilian inmate prison camps, the outgrant document will reference the ISA governing services the

installation will provide the prison camp, and the services the prison camp will provide the installation, if applicable,

under the memoranda of agreement establishing an installation civilian inmate labor program. The outgrant document

by itself does not establish a civilian inmate labor program. A separate memoranda of agreement with the corrections

facility is still required. All outgrants of Army real property will be prepared in accordance with AR 405–80.

d. Installations intending to establish a civilian inmate labor program using inmates to be housed in the on–post

prison camp will follow the procedures outlined in chapter 2 above.

3–6. Interservice, interagency, or interdepartmental support agreements

The ISAs documents the services installations will provide the Federal civilian inmate prison camp and the services the

prison camp will provide the installation, in return. The ISAs will be prepared in accordance with DODI 4000.19 and

AR 37–49 and will cover the same period as the outgrant document. The ISAs are subject to annual review to examine

current costs and determine next year project assignments. Installation commanders have the authority to negotiate and

approve ISAs locally. Executing an ISA does not establish a civilian inmate labor program. A separate memoranda of

agreement with the corrections facility is still required in accordance with the procedures delineated in chapter 2 above.

a. Utility sales contracts and memoranda of agreement establishing civilian inmate labor programs using inmates

from the on–post Federal civilian inmate prison are attachments to the ISAs.

b. The ISAs will require the Federal civilian inmate prison camp to have a mutually acceptable utility and/or energy

conservation program and an environmental management plan. The prison camp will provide assurance that it is

resourced to carry out these provisions.

c. No credits for inmate labor will be given to offset support services provided to the Federal civilian inmate prison

camp.

Chapter 4

Reporting and Recordkeeping

4–1. Incident reports

Serious incidents, that is, walkaways, escapes, riots, disturbances, and any criminal action involving inmates participat-

ing in the civilian inmate labor program and/or occurring in onpost civilian inmate prison camps will be reported in

accordance with AR 190–40. One copy of incident reports will be provided to HQ, IMA (SFIM–PL), and HQDA,

Office of the Chief of Public Affairs, Public Communications Division (SAPA–PCD). Accidents involving inmates will

be investigated and reported in accordance with AR 385–40.

4–2. Media coverage

Any media coverage involving inmates participating in the Civilian Inmate Labor Program, or involving onpost civilian

inmate prison camps, will be reported through command channels to HQ, IMA (SFIMPL), and HQDA, Office of the

Chief of Public Affairs, Public Communications Division (SAPA–PCD). Report media source (newspaper, magazine,

radio, television), name of media source (and radio and/or television channel), date of coverage, synopsis of report, and

whether the report had local, regional, or national coverage. Provide copies of the article and/or script, if available.

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4–3. Recordkeeping

Installations will maintain records of their civilian inmate labor programs. These records will be used in higher

headquarters efforts to assess program utility and assess the effectiveness of key management controls identified in

appendix D. The management and final disposition of all civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison

camp records will comply with AR 25–400–2. Recordkeeping will cover the following topics:

a. For civilian inmate labor programs—

(1) Summary listing of all work projects employing civilian inmates, including project duration, number of civilian

inmates used on the project, number of corrections facility personnel supervising work details assigned to each project,

and number of Army military and civilian personnel engaged in oversight activities per project.

(2) Cost avoidance generated from civilian inmate labor. Cost avoidance is based on determining the dollar value of

inmate labor by equating inmate work performed to the dollar value and costs of similar work if performed by

authorized and funded positions, or by contract. Cost avoidance must be calculated using the following equation:

Cost avoidance=Dollar value of civilian labor (including fringe benefits, monitoring, and overhead) and/or contracts for

functions inmates now perform (including overtime) minus Cost of equipment, materials, and supplies furnished to

inmate labor details minus Costs of transporting inmates to and from corrections facility (as applicable) minus Inmate

meal costs (if provided) minus Program administration costs minus Any other costs associated with the civilian inmate

labor program.

(3) Synopsis of special incidents and/or military police (MP) reports involving civilian inmate labor. This includes

significant events and anticipated problems.

(4) Media inquiries and responses provided.

(5) Synopsis of any complaints and/or concerns from the surrounding off–post community and family members

regarding inmate labor, together with any action taken to resolve the complaint.

(6) Borrowed military manpower returned to duty resulting from inmate labor.

b. For civilian inmate prison camps—

(1) Monthly average daily population for the facility.

(2) Any Right of Entry violations and corrective measures taken.

(3) Direct and reimbursable obligations for support provided to the civilian inmate prison camp, to allow for

analysis of spending trends.

(4) Synopsis of any complaints and/or concerns from the surrounding off–post community and family members

regarding the civilian inmate prison camp, together with any action taken to resolve the complaint.

(5) Synopsis of special incidents and/or MP reports involving the civilian inmate prison camp. This includes

significant events and anticipated problems.

(6) Media inquiries and responses provided.

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Appendix A

References

Section I

Required Publications

AR 11–2

Management Controls. (Cited in para 1–4e(4).)

AR 15–6

Procedures for Investigating Officers and Boards of Officers. (Cited in para 2–3g(4)(b).)

AR 37–49

Budgeting, Funding, and Reimbursement for Base Operations Support of Army Activities. (Cited in para 3–6.)

AR 190–40

Serious Incident Report. (Cited in paras 1–4h(1), 3–4d, 4–1, and D–4c(5).)

AR 385–40

Accident Reporting and Records. (Cited in para 4–1.)

AR 405–80

Management of Title and Granting Use of Real Property. (Cited in paras 3–3j and 3–5c.)

AR 420–41

Acquisition and Sales of Utilities Services. (Cited in paras 3–3k.)

AR 600–55

The Army Driver and Operator Standardization Program (Selection, Training, Testing and Licensing). (Cited in para

2–3b(3).)

5 USC 7101 et. seq.

Federal Labor Management Relations Statute. (Cited in para 2–4e.)

10 USC 2667

Leases, NonExcess Property of Military Departments. (Cited in paras 1–1, 3–2b, 3–2c, 3–5a(8).)

18 USC 4125(a)

Public Works; Prison Camps. (Cited in paras 1–4j(1), 1–4k(1), 2–1a, 2–1f, and 2–3c.)

28 CFR 301

Inmate Accident Compensation. (Cited in para 2–3i.)

29 CFR 1910

Occupational Safety and Health Standards. (Cited in para 2–3i(3).)

31 USC 1342

Limitation on Voluntary Services. (Cited in para 3–2c.)

DODI 4000.19

Interservice, Interdepartmental, and Interagency Support. (Cited in paras 3–3i and 3–6.)

Executive Order 11755

Prison Labor. (Cited in paras 1–4j(1), 1–4k(1), 2–1d(3), and 2–1f.)

PL 103–337, Section 1065

Demonstration Project for Use of Army Installations to Provide Prerelease Employment Training to Nonviolent

Offenders in State Penal Systems. (Cited in paras 1–1 and 2–1d(1).)

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Section II

Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read it to understand this

publication. Army regulations and pamphlets are available on the Army Publishing Directorate’s Web site at http://

www.apd.army.mil.

AR 5–9

Area Support Responsibilities

AR 5–20

Commercial Activities Program

AR 25–400–2

The Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS)

AR 190–47

The U.S. Army Correctional System

18 USC Chapter 303

Bureau of Prisons (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/USCODE/INDEX.HTML.)

18 USC Chapter 305

Commitment and Transfer (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/USCODE/INDEX.HTML.)

18 USC Chapter 1385

Posse Comitatus Act (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/USCODE/INDEX.HTML.)

28 USC 1346(b), 2671–2680

Federal Tort Claims Act (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/USCODE/INDEX.HTML.)

DODD 5525.5

DOD Cooperation with Civilian Law Enforcement Officials (Available at http://www.dtic.whs/directives.)

FAR, Part 22.201

Convict Labor (Available at http://www.arnet.gov.far/.)

Section III

Prescribed Forms

This section contains no entries.

Section IV

Referenced Forms

DA Form 11–2–R

Management Control Evaluation Certification Statement (Available at http://www.apd.army.mil.)

Appendix B

Memorandum of Agreement Format

This memorandum of agreement (MOA) format addresses agreements between Army organizations and Federal

corrections facilities under the control of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) and is the template for developing

such agreements. This MOA format contains all required clauses for compliance with Army policy on using civilian

inmates. This MOA format may be modified to accommodate State/local civilian inmate use authorized under the

exceptions cited in paragraph 2–1d of this regulation. Users of this template should make the appropriate substitutions

indicated in bold print and bounded by parenthesis to tailor this template for their own use.

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Page 18

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement

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Page 19

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued

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Page 20

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued

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Page 21

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued

17

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Page 22

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued

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Page 23

Figure B–1. Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued

Appendix C

Sample Inmate Labor Plan

This sample Inmate Labor Plan may be used as a template to develop user Inmate Labor Plans. This sample Inmate

Labor Plan contains all required clauses for compliance with Army policy on using civilian inmates. Users of this

template should make the appropriate substitutions indicated in bold print and bounded by parenthesis to tailor this

template for their own use. User Inmate Labor Plans may be a regulation, letter of instruction, policy memorandum, or

other document of the user’s choice.

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Page 24

Figure C–1. Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued

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Page 25

Figure C–1. Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued

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Page 26

Figure C–1. Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued

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Appendix D

Management Control Evaluation Checklist

D–1. Function

The function covered by this checklist is the administration of the Army’s Civilian Inmate Labor Program, which is

currently limited to using inmates from facilities under the control of the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

D–2. Purpose

The purpose of this checklist is to assist HQDA, HQ, IMA, and installation program administrators in evaluating the

key management controls outlined below. It is not intended to cover all controls.

D–3. Instructions

Answers must be based on the actual testing of key management controls (for example, document analysis, direct

observation, sampling, simulation, other). Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and corrective action

indicated in supporting documentation. These key management controls must be formally evaluated annually. Certifica-

tion that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11–2–R (Management Control

Evaluation Certification Statement).

D–4. Test Questions

a. Are any installations using civilian inmate labor without HQDA approval?

b. Do all installations using civilian inmate labor have an HQDA approved Memorandum of Agreement with the

provider corrections facility and an Inmate Labor Plan governing operation of civilian inmate labor details on the

installation? Do these memorandum of agreements and Inmate Labor Plans reflect current Department of Army

guidance on civilian inmate labor use?

c. Are installations using civilian inmates in accordance with existing legislation and/or regulations and/or policy

governing civilian inmate labor utilization on Army installations? Specifically

(1) Are Army civilian and/or military personnel engaged in custodial supervision (guarding) of inmate labor details?

(2) Are inmates working in and around government housing areas? Are inmates working in and around schools,

recreation areas and/or facilities, day care centers, recreation libraries, and similar facilities while these facilities are

open to the public?

(3) Are only minimum security, nonviolent inmates being used on inmate labor details? Do inmates meet Army

Civilian Inmate Labor Program selection criteria defined in paragraph 2–3e, above?

(4) Are inmates performing only those functions allowed under 18 USC 4125(a) or by HQDA?

(5) Are incidents involving Army installation civilian inmate labor programs being reported in accordance with AR

190–40 and reporting guidance in this regulation?

d. For Army installations operating civilian inmate labor programs from on–post corrections facilities, are these

corrections facilities being given credits for inmate labor to offset base operations support services provided to the

corrections facilities?

e. Do all installations with onpost corrections facilities have HQDA approval to rent facilities and/or land to

correctional systems?

f. Do the costs of operating civilian inmate labor programs on Army installations exceed the cost avoidance

generated from using civilian inmates, that is, do installation civilian inmate labor programs continue to generate cost

avoidance?

D–5. Supersession

This checklist is the first checklist developed for the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program.

D–6. Comments

Help make this a better tool for evaluating management controls. Submit comments to: Assistant Chief of Staff for

I n s t a l l a t i o n M a n a g e m e n t , P l a n s a n d O p e r a t i o n s D i v i s i o n ( D A I M – M D , 6 0 0 A r m y P e n t a g o n , W a s h i n g t o n , D C

20310–0600).

Appendix E

18 USC 4125(A), and Executive Order 11755

18 USC 4125(a)

The Attorney General may make available to the heads of the several departments the services of United States

prisoners under terms, conditions, and rates mutually agreed upon, for constructing or repairing roads, clearing,

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Page 28

maintaining and reforesting public lands, building levees, and constructing or repairing any other public ways or works

financed wholly or in major part by funds appropriated by Congress.

Executive Order 11755, Dec 29, 1973, as amended by Executive Order 12608, Sep 9, 1987 and

Executive Order 12943, Dec 13, 1994, Prison Labor.

The development of the occupational and educational skills of prison inmates is essential to their rehabilitation and to

their ability to make an effective return to free society. Meaningful employment serves to develop those skills. It is also

true, however, that care must be exercised to avoid either the exploitation of convict labor or any unfair competition

between convict labor and free labor in the production of goods and services.

Under sections 3621 and 3622 of title 18 of the United States Code, the Bureau of Prisons is empowered to authorize

Federal prisoners to work at paid employment in the community during their terms of imprisonment under conditions

that protect against both the exploitation of convict labor and unfair competition with free labor.

Several States and other jurisdictions have similar laws or regulations under which individuals confined for violations

of the laws of those places may be authorized to work at paid employment in the community.

Executive Order No. 325A, which was originally issued by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1905, prohibits the

employment, in the performance of Federal contracts, of any person who is serving a sentence of imprisonment at hard

labor imposed by a court of a State, territory, or municipality.

I have now determined that Executive Order No. 325A should be replaced with a new Executive Order which would

permit the employment of non-Federal prison inmates in the performance of Federal contracts under terms and

conditions that are comparable to those now applicable to inmates of Federal prisons.

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the United States, it is hereby ordered as

follows:

SECTION 1.

a. All contracts involving the use of appropriated funds which shall hereafter be entered into by any department or

agency of the executive branch for performance in any State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto

Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Trust

Territory of the Pacific Islands shall, unless otherwise provided by law, contain a stipulation forbidding in the

performance of such contracts, the employment of persons undergoing sentences of imprisonment which have been

imposed by any court of a State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands,

Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Trust Territory of the Pacific

Islands. This limitation, however, shall not prohibit the employment by a contractor in the performance of such

contracts of persons on parole or probation to work at paid employment during the term of their sentence or persons

who have been pardoned or who have served their terms. Nor shall it prohibit the employment by a contractor in the

performance of such contracts of persons confined for violation of the laws of any of the States, the District of

Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the

Northern Mariana Islands, or the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands who are authorized to work at paid employment

in the community under the laws of such jurisdiction, if

((1)(a)) The worker is paid or is in an approved work training program on a voluntary basis;

((b)) Representatives of local union central bodies or similar labor union organizations have been consulted;

((c)) Such paid employment will not result in the displacement of employed workers, or be applied in skills, crafts,

or trades in which there is a surplus of available gainful labor in the locality, or impair existing contracts for services;

and

((d)) The rates of pay and other conditions of employment will not be less than those paid or provided for work of a

similar nature in the locality in which the work is being performed; and

(2). The Attorney General has certified that the work release laws or regulations of the jurisdiction involved are in

conformity with the requirements of this order.

((b)) After notice and opportunity for hearing, the Attorney General shall revoke any such certification under section

1(a)(2) if he finds that the workrelease program of the jurisdiction involved is not being conducted in conformity with

the requirements of this order or with its intent or purposes.

((c)) The provisions of this order do not apply to purchases made under the micropurchase authority contained in

section 32 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, as amended.

SECTION 2. The Federal Procurement Regulations, the Armed Services Procurement Regulations, and to the extent

necessary, any supplemental or comparable regulations issued by any agency of the executive branch shall be revised

to reflect the policy prescribed by this order.

SECTION 3. Executive Order No. 325A is hereby superseded.

SECTION 4. This order shall be effective as of January 1, 1974.

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Glossary

Section I

Abbreviations

ACSIM

Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management

AR

Army Regulation

ASA(FMC)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller)

ASA(IE)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations Environment)

ASA(MRA)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)

CFR

Code of Federal Regulation

DA

Department of the Army

DCS, G-1

Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel

DOD

Department of Defense

DODI

Department of Defense Instruction

EO

Executive Order

FAR

Federal Acquisition Regulation

FBOP

Federal Bureau of Prisons

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

HQ, IMA

Headquarters, Installation Management Agency

ISA

Interservice, Interagency, or Interdepartmental Support Agreement

MOA

Memorandum of Agreement

MP

Military Police

NAFI

Nonappropriated fund instrumentality

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OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

PL

Public Law

PM

Provost Marshal General

SJA

Staff Judge Advocate

USC

United States Code

Section II

Terms

10 USC 2667 (Leases; Non-Excess Property)

The Federal law governing leases of DOD property.

18 USC 4125(a) (Public Works; Prison Camps)

The Federal law governing services Federal civilian inmates can perform for DOD agencies.

29 CFR 1910 (Occupational Safety and Health Standards)

The Federal law governing workplace safety and health standards.

31 USC 1342 (Limitation on Voluntary Services)

The Federal law prohibiting Federal government employees or officers from accepting voluntary services except as

specifically allowed by law.

Executive Order 11755

Executive Order governing use of non-Federal civilian inmates on Federal contracts.

Civilian inmates

Prisoners incarcerated in a Federal, State, or local government penal facility. Prisoners of a military confinement

facility are not civilian inmates.

Civilian Inmate Labor Program

Legislation, regulations, policies, and procedures governing the use of civilian inmates on Army installations.

Compensation

Includes any payment, gift, benefit, reward, favor, or gratuity provided directly or indirectly for services rendered by

the person accepting such payment. Compensation will be deemed indirectly received if it is paid to an entity other

than the individual, in exchange for services performed by the individual.

Corrections facility

Facility providing correctional treatment to civilian prisoners to motivate them for return to the civilian community.

Custodial supervision

Any activity undertaken to ensure charge and control, i.e. guarding inmates. This does not include oversight or quality

assurance.

DA personnel

Department of the Army civilian employees; active duty personnel; National Guard and Reserve personnel on active

duty for training or when performing Federal duties or engaging in any activity directly related to the performance of a

Federal duty or function.

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Direct labor costs

Costs for inmate labor hours worked, i.e., labor costs charged by the corrections facility for working inmates on Army

property.

DOD personnel

Civilian employees and active duty personnel of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps.

Employment

A relationship under which an individual furnishes services in return for any payment or other compensation paid

directly or indirectly to the individual for the services.

Gratuity

Any gift, favor, discount, entertainment, hospitality, loan, forbearance, or other item having monetary value. It includes

services as well as gifts of training, transportation, local travel, lodgings and meals, whether provided in-kind, by

purchase of a ticket, payment in advance, or reimbursement after the expense has been incurred.

HQDA

The executive part of the Department of the Army at the seat of Government. Consists of the Office of the Secretary of

the Army and the Army Staff.

Installation

Installations, agencies, airfields, areas, armories, arsenals, bases, camps, centers, depots, districts, divisions, forts,

garrisons, laboratories, projects, etc. under the Active Army, the U.S. Army Reserve, the Army National Guard, and

Civil Works responsibilities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Interservice, interagency, or interdepartmental support

Support provided by one Federal agency or subdivision thereof to another Federal, State or local agency or subdivision

thereof when at least one of the participating agencies or subdivisions is the Department of Defense or a DOD

Component.

Headquarters, Installation Management Agency

Headquarters, Installation Management Agency (HQ, IMA). A subordinate command of Office of the Assistant Chief

of Staff for Installation Management (OACSIM). Responsible for all actions at Army installations worldwide through

their seven regions.

Memorandum of Agreement

The documentation of mutually agreed statement of facts, intentions, procedures, parameters, and policies for future

actions and matters of coordination.

Minimum (level) security inmates

Civilian inmates who do not need constant guard and who have committed nonviolent crimes. Minimum security

inmates participating in the Civilian Inmate Labor Program are also usually within 1 year of parole, are medically

cleared for regular duty status with no medical or psychological restrictions, and have no prior employment or

relationship with the host agency (Army organization using civilian inmates).

Nominal costs

Minor costs incidental to installation Civilian Inmate Labor Program operations. Nominal costs may be costs for

equipment, materials and supplies used in inmate labor details, telephone calls to corrections facilities, lunch time

meals, and transporting inmates to and from corrections facilities.

Oversight

Activities associated with specifying work to be done; training inmates in performing assigned work, using special

equipment, and safety precautions; showing inmates location of the work site; and performing quality assurance

inspections of inmate work.

Program administration costs

Costs incurred by the installation in administrating their Civilian Inmate Labor Program, such as preparing the

Memorandum of Agreement or Interservice, Interagency, or Interdepartmental Support Agreement, oversight, and

reporting.

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Quality assurance

Those actions taken by the Government to determine that the services received meet quality, quantity, and timeliness

specifications.

Serious incidents

Any actual or alleged incident, accident, misconduct, or act, primarily criminal in nature that, because of its nature,

gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences warrants timely notice to HQDA.

Section III

Special Abbreviations and Terms

This section contains no entries.

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Index

This index is organized alphabetically by topic and by subtopic within a topic. Topics and subtopics are identified by

paragraph number.

Accountability of Inmates , 2-3f, 2-3l

Approval Authority , 1-4a

Control and Custody , 2-3f, 2-3k

Cost Avoidance , 1-4k, 2-1b, 2-4a, 4-3b

Credits for Inmate Labor , 2-3b, 3-6c

Damage to Property , 2-3g, 3-3a

Demonstration Project , 1-1, 2-1d

Escape , 1-4h, 2-3e, 3-4c, 3-4d, 4-1

Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) , 2-1a, 3-2b, 3-5

Fraternization , 2-3i

Gratuity , 2-3b

Housing Areas , 2-3a

Inmate Labor Plan, , 1-4, 2-4

Interservice, Interagency, or Interdepartmental Support Agreements (ISA) , 1-4, 1-5, 2-3, 3-3, 3-5, 3-6

Labor Unions , 1-4, 1-5, 2-4

Leases , 1-1, 1-5c, 3-1, 3-2, 3-5

Liability , 2-3i

License, Operators , 2-3b

Local Inmates , 1-1, 1-4k, 2-1, 2-2

Media , 1-4c, 2-3m, 2-4a, 4-2, 4-3d, 4-3l

Medical Care , 2-3j, 3-4b,3-4c

Medical Records , 2-3k

Medical Supplies , 2-3a

Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) , 1-4, 1-5, 2-1, 2-3, 2-4, 3-5, 3-6

Minimum security inmate classification , 2-3e, 3-1

Military Police (MP) , 3-4d, 4-3c

Outgrant , 3-5, 3-6

Oversight/Monitoring , 2-3f, 2-4b, 2-4l, 4-3a

Nominal Costs , 2-3b

Permit , 3-5

Press Release , 2-3m

Prison Camps , 1-1, 1-4, 2-4, 3-1, 3-2, 3-4, 3-5, 4-1, 4-2, 4-5

Real Property , 1-4a, 1-4e, 1-4g, 3-2c, 3-3j, 3-5a, 3-5c

Reimbursement , 1-4b, 2-3b, 2-3j, 3-3i

Rights of Entry , 1-4g

Riots , 1-4h, 2-3e, 3-4c, 3-4d, 3-4e, 4-1

Safety , 2-3a, 2-3b, 2-3f, 2-3i, 2-3l, 2-4b

Security , 2-3k, 2-4b, 3-3b, 3-4, 3-5

Serious Incidents , 1-4h, 2-4a, 3-4c, 4-1

Services Inmates Perform , 2-3c

State Inmates , 1-1, 1-4k, 2-1, 2-2, 2-3e, 3-2, 3-3i, 3-5

Timecards , 2-3f

Training , 1-5c, 2-1d, 2-3b, 2-3f, 2-3i, 2-3l, 2-4b

Voluntary Services , 2-1d, 3-2c

Weapons , 3-4a

Utility , 3-3k, 3-5a, 3-6a, 3-6b, 4-3

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USAPD

ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING SYSTEM

OneCol FORMATTER WIN32 Version 219

PIN:

074833–000

DATE:

01-12-05

TIME:

12:52:15

PAGES SET: 33

DATA FILE:

C:\wincomp\r210-35.fil

DOCUMENT:

AR 210–35

SECURITY:

UNCLASSIFIED

DOC STATUS: REVISION

Un-Classified

Israeli interrogators in US-run prisons in Iraq, General says
... when the general formerly in charge of the US-run Iraqi prison system, ... of Israeli interrogators and contractors working within US prisons in Iraq,

 

______

and even more Bushkevik TREASON unto his Chabad Lubavitch Controllers

What Is This Batelle
Plane Spraying?
http://www.freewebs.com/daniscafe/aerosoloperations.htm
2-28-5
 
 
 
 
 
 

___

Scientists Baffled As Bird
Numbers Plummet
Mystery Of The Silent Woodlands

By Michael McCarthy
Environment Editor
The Independent - UK
2-28-5
 
It has hardly been noticed, but it is another sinister warning sign of a world going badly wrong. Populations of some of Britain's most attractive woodland birds are plummeting at a rate that threatens them with extinction, and nobody knows why.
 
Precipitous declines in the numbers of some species, of up to four-fifths, have been registered over the past 30 years, but scientists are just realising what is happening, and they have no simple explanation.
 
In its scale and its range, the phenomenon is one of the most ominous events in the natural history of Britain over the past half-century. Perversely, the decline comes at a time when Britain is planting more woodlands than ever, and forest management has never been more sympathetic to wildlife conservation.
 
About a dozen species of small birds that have flitted through our woodlands for thousands of years are suddenly in serious trouble. This may be associated with climate change, linked to the damage that excess deer numbers are doing to the undergrowth in woodlands, or in some cases, linked to trouble for birds on migration routes to and from Africa.
 
The endangered species are less familiar than common garden visitors such as robins and blackbirds, which is perhaps why their disappearance has taken longer to register. But now a study, appearing next month, makes the picture clear for the first time.
 
It shows that five of the species - the spotted flycatcher, the lesser spotted woodpecker, the lesser whitethroat, the lesser redpoll and the tree pipit - plunged by more than three-quarters between 1966 and 1999, and continues to decline.
 
The population of the spotted flycatcher fell by no less than 85 per cent, and that of the lesser spotted woodpecker by 81 per cent. Another five species - the willow tit, the marsh tit, the woodcock, the dunnock or hedge sparrow and the willow warbler - fell by between half and three-quarters, and two more species, the songthrush and the bullfinch, fell by nearly a half.
 
Yet another group, for which there are no reliable numerical figures, is nevertheless known to have fallen significantly in either numbers or in range, or in both. These include the long-eared owl, the hawfinch and the nightingale.
 
In southern England, where the situation is worst, some of these species have virtually disappeared. "These birds are falling off the radar in a quite catastrophic way and we have no real idea why," said Graham Appleton of the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), Britain's leading bird research organisation. Three of its researchers, Rob Fuller, David Noble and Des Vanhinsbergh, produced the study with Ken Smith, a researcher from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.
 
The most puzzling and perhaps most worrying aspect of the woodland bird decline, apart from its remarkable scale, is that there is no obvious single cause, as there has been with the dramatic and well-known decline over the past 30 years of British birds on farmland.
 
Species of the fields such as the skylark, the grey partridge, the corn bunting and the turtle dove have also dropped enormously in numbers, but the reason is well-known, the range of new agricultural practices that came in with the intensive farming revolution.
 
Turning these declines around by more wildlife-friendly farming methods is now official government policy, and may well eventually succeed.
 
But the difficulty with addressing the woodland bird decline is that there is no obvious simple reason for it, and thus no obvious simple solution.
 
In their study, which will be published in the March edition of the journal British Birds, the researchers offer seven possible causes which may be behind the declines. They are:
 
* Pressures on migrant birds during migration, or on their wintering grounds in Africa;
 
* Climate change in Britain itself, especially changes in the timing of the emergence of insects used as food, and the drying-out of woodlands;
 
* Reduction in the actual numbers of insects and other invertebrates;
 
* Impacts of land use on woodland edges and on habitats outside woodland;
 
* Reduced management of lowland woodland;
 
* Intensified habitat modification by deer, which eat the woodland bushes, shrubs and grasses, and stop regeneration of trees, reducing nesting areas and insect populations;
 
* New pressure on nests and young birds from predators, such as grey squirrels, members of the crow family, and great spotted woodpeckers.
 
But at present, these possibilities are speculative, and the true causes of an enormous change in Britain's natural environment remain a mystery.
 
©2005 Independent News & Media (UK) Ltd.
 
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environment/story.jsp?story=614558

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One  cozy little Red Esau Sofiet Talmudic Communitarian third wave...shemborg collective

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1109475188966

American, CIS Jews team up

American and Russian Jewish organizations are teaming up to fight anti-Semitism and promote Jewish identity in the Commonwealth of Independent States.

The American Jewish Congress-Council for World Jewry and the Federation of Jewish Communities of the CIS have announced the scheduled signing of a memorandum of understanding in Moscow on Tuesday that will formalize a de facto partnership.

"By joining our efforts and collective experiences, and bringing together the strengths of our respective communities, we can more effectively mobilize against the evident and profoundly disturbing reawakening of anti-Semitism," said Russian-born Israeli diamond and real estate magnate Lev Leviev, who is also the president of the FJC. "We also believe that building a strong Jewish community here in the CIS is the best way to counter those trying to promote bigotry and hate against the Jewish people."

One of their first tasks will be to combat xenophobia, intolerance and anti-Semitism. Already, the FJC has announced the launch of a "press club" aimed at countering hate speech within Russian society, with meetings every few weeks of journalists and the public to discuss national ethnic conflicts and differences.

The Russian Academy of Sciences argued last week that Russian media promote negative stereotypes of various ethnicities through sensationalist coverage and the free use of racist rhetoric.

Shut them up crieth the devil

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an anti-shem-ite is any one the Talmudic jews hate, for they will have their "Master Race" and be as gods in their laws they make unto themselves

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Noahide news Part 131

 

The Last Deception

Section 2

  section 3   

section 4 

  section 5  

section 6  

section 7 

  section 8 

section  9     

section 10  

section 11  

section 12  

section 13 

section 14 "The Protocols of the Illuminated Elders of Tzion"

  section 15 

      section 16 "The Beast Has Risen" 

 section 16-B

 section 17  

  section 17-B  

  section 17-C   

section 17-D

  section 18    

section 18-B

section 19    

section 19-B

section 20  

 section 20-B 

  section 20-C 

  section 20-D 

  section 20-E

section 21 

  section 22  

section 23

section 24

section 25

Daniel's Seventy Weeks

Was Peter a Jew?

The Two Witnesses

"The Whore of Babylon"

Mystery Babylon

 Are the " Ael-ians coming"

Ael-ians II

Wall Street " The Mark" is Here

Wall Street II

Wall Street III

It has happened "War Declared upon and in America"

Declared section Part II

"Questions"

"All you ever need to know about their god and Qabalah"

Qabalah Part II

Qabalah Part III

National Identification Card

 ADDED Material 3-25-2004 Prophecy Unfolding

A Sincere Request to  "Rapture" Teachers

"Seventh Trumpet"

Compulsory Constitutional Cremation

Homeland Security, "The Police State"

"The Fourth Beast"

The Babylonian Talmudic Mystical Qabalah

The Scribes of Baal

How will they do it- " The false-christ"

False Christ Part II

The Word

Baal's food Tax

"The Changing of the Guards"

"Summation" The beginning of sorrows has begun

"Moshiach ben Lucifer"

Satan's Tales "Wagging the Global Dog"

"Satan's Plan", Protocols of Zion ( of course they will dispute it's authenticity)

I Witch, New One World Order Seal

Satan's Enforcers of Quaballah

Satan's Enforcers Part 2

Satan's Enforcers Part 3

Satan's Enforcers Part 4

The Seed of God or the Seed of Satan, Your choice by faith

Pledge of Allegiance Part Two

I AM, the Revelation of Jesus Christ

King of the Noachides

"Beware the Mark"

"Beware the Mark" part two

"Beware the Mark" Part 3

"Beware the Mark" Part Four

"Beware the Mark" Part Five

 Harvest of Fear

"Harvest of Fear" Part Two

"Harvest of Fear" Part Three

National Organization Against Hasidic International Talmudic Enforcement

Where's Da Plane Boss, wheres da plane?

The Tarot Card Killer of Olam Ha Ba

The "Lessor Jew"

Temporary Coup d' Etat

The Federal Reserve, Fed up with the Fed?

The Protocols Today. Dispute this, Liars !

Protocols Today Part Two

Letter to a friend "It's not the Jews Dummy"

Identity of the Illuminati

The "Son's of the Synagogue of Satan"Chabad Lubavitch

Chabad Satan Part 1A

Chabad Satan Part 2

Chabad Satan Part 2A

Chabad Satan Part 2B

Chabad Satan Part 3

Chabad Satan Part 3A

Chabad Satan Part 4

Chabad Satan Part 4A

Chabad Satan Part 4B

Chabad Satan Part 4C

Chabad Satan Part 5

Chabad satan Part 5A

Chabad Satan Part 5B

Chabad Satan Part 5C

Chabad Satan Part 6

Chabad Satan Part 6B

Chabad Satan Part 6C

Chabad Satan Part 6D

Chabad Satan Part 7

Chabad Satan Part 7A

Chabad Satan Part 7B

Chabad Satan Part 7C

Chabad Satan Part 8

Chabad Satan Part 8A

Chabad Satan Part 8B

Chabad Satan Part 8C

Chabad Satan Part 8D

Chabad Satan Part 9

Chabad Satan Part 9A

Chabad Satan Part 9B

Chabad Satan Part 9C

Chabad Satan Part 9D

Chabad Satan Part 10

Chabad Satan Part 10A

Chabad Satan Part 10B

Chabad Satan Part 10C

Chabad Satan Part 10D

Chabad Satan Part 11

The Chabad Satan Wall of Destruction

Chabad Wall Part 2

Chabad Wall Part 3

Chabad Wall Part 4

The Chabad Phoenix is Rising

Columbia "The Queen of Heaven"

Patriot Akt II, Comrad 

The Infiltration of the leaven "Jerusalem Council"

Satan's One World Religion

OWR Part 2

OWR Part 3

OWR Part 4

One World Religion Part 5

One World Religion Part 6

One World Religion Part 7 Religion Part 7

Re the god of Talmud Bavli

Perpetual Purim

"The Raiser of Taxes"

Jewish Persecution

Obedient Ishmael Kislev 19, 5764

The Final Nazi

Nazi Part 2

Nazi Part 3

Nazi Part 4

The Lord of the Ring, the Return of the Talmudic king

Changing the Time and the Laws

The Leaven of the Chabad Lubavitch Chassidim Pharisees

Exod-U.S the coming Geula 

anti-semitism?

Who murdered Jesus the Christ

"Replacement Theology" of Judaic Talmudism

Eating Rainbow Stew with a Silver Spoon, underneath a Noahide Sky

the gods

"The Two Whores"

Noahide News

Noahide News 2

Noahide News Part 3

Noahide News Part 4

Noahide News Part 5

Noahide News Part 6

Noahide News Part 7

Noahide News Part 8

Noahide News Part 9

Noahide News Part 10

Noahide News Part 11

Noahide News Part 12

Noahide News Part 13

Noahide News Part 14

Noahide News Part 15

Noahide News Part 16

Noahide News Part 17

Noahide News Part 18

Noahide News Part 19

Noahide News Part 20

Noahide News Part 21

Noahide News part 22

Noahide News Part 23

Noahide News part 24

Noahide News Part 25

Noahide News Part 26

Noahide News part 27

Noahide News Part 28

Noahide News Part 29

Noahide News Part 30

Noahide News Part 31

Noahide News Part 32

Noahide News Part 33

Noahide News Part 34

Noahide News Part 35

Noahide News Part 36

Noahide News Part 37

Noahide News Part 38

Noahide News Part 39

Noahide News Part 40

Noahide News Part 41

Noahide News Part 42

Noahide News Part 43

Noahide News Part 44

Noahide News Part 45

Noahide News Part 46

Noahide News Part 47

Noahide News Part 48

Noahide News Part 49

Noahide News Part 50

Noahide News Part 51

Noahide News Part 52

Noahide News Part 53

Noahide News Part 54

Noahide News Part 55

Noahide NewsPart 56

Noahide News Part 57

Noahide News Part 58

Noahide News Part 59

Noahide News Part 60

Noahide News Part 61

Noahide News Part 62

Noahide News Part 63

Noahide News Part 64 

Noahide News Part 65

Noahide News Part 66

Noahide News Part 67

Noahide News Part 68

Noahide News Part 69

Letter to Bob Jones and President Bush and all televangelist

Noahide News Part 70

Noahide News Part 71

Noahide News Part 72

Noahide News Part 73

Noahide News Part 74

Noahide News Part 75

Noahide News Part 76

Noahide News Part 77

Noahide News Part 78

Noahide News Part 79

Noahide News Part 80

Noahide News Part 81

Noahide News Part 82

Noahide News Part 83 ALERT ALERT ALERT

Noahide News Part 84

Noahide News Part 85

Noahide News Part 86

Noahide News Part 87

Noahide News Part 88

Noahide News Part 89

Noahide News part 90

Noahide News Part 91

Noahide News Part 92

Noahide News Part 93

Noahide News Part 94

Noahide News Part 95

Noahide News Part 96

Noahide News Part 97

Noahide News Part 98

Noahide News Part 99

Noahide News Part 100

Noahide News Part 101

Noahide News Part 102

Noahide News Part 103

Noahide News Part 104

Noahide News Part 105

Noahide News Part 106

Noahide News Part 107

Noahide News Part 108

Noahide News Part 109

Noahide News Part 110

Noahide News Part 111

Noahide News Part 112

Noahide News Part 113

Noahide News Part 114

Noahide Naws Part 115

Noahide News Part 116

Noahide News Part 117

Noahide News Part 118

Noahide News Part 119

Noahide News Part 120

Noahide News Part 121

Noahide News Part 122

Noahide News Part 123

Noahide News Part 124

Noahide News part 125

Noahide News Part 126

Noahide News Part 127

Noahide News Part 128

Noahide News Part 129

The Revelation of Jesus the Christ the LORD God and His Father

Noahide News Part 130

Noahide news Part 131