Qabalah-B

Discovered : by W.H. Wollaston in 1803

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The element is named after the asteroid Pallas, also discovered in 1803.

Description :

A silvery metal that resists corrosion and is used as a catalyst in the chemicals industry. Palladium metal has one unique feature - hydrogen gas can filter through it.

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations

Origin : The name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon ‘seolfur’, and the chemical symbol from the Latin ‘argentum’, both meaning silver.

Description :

Silver tarnishes slowly as sulfur compounds in the atmosphere react with the surface to form black silver sulfide. Silver has been used for jewellery and tableware since ancient times, but it is also employed for silvering glass and in photography, as well as for industrial uses. World production is about 10,000 tonnes per year. Silver is present in the human body but has no known role.

Discovered : 1817 by Friedrich Stromeyer

Isolated in Gottingen, Germany

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin 'cadmia', the name for the mineral calamine.

Description :

A silvery metal produced as a by-product of zinc refining. It is used in rechargeable batteries, and cadmium sulfide was once a common pigment known as cadmium yellow. Cadmium accumulates in the body; although a person’s daily intake may be as little as 0.05 milligrammes, he or she will have stored, on average about 50 milligrammes. Cadmium is a poison and is known to cause birth defects and cancer. As a result, there are moves to limit its use.

Discovered : by C.G. Mosander in 1839

Isolated in Stockholm, Sweden

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek 'lanthana’, meaning to lie hidden.

Description :

A soft metal that rapidly tarnishes and burns easily when ignited. It is used in special glass, and flints for pocket lighters are made with it.

Discovered : by D. Coster and G.C. von Hevesey in 1923

Isolated in Copenhagen, Denmark

Origin : The name is derived from 'Hafnia', the Latin word for Copenhagen.

Description :

A shiny silvery metal that resists corrosion. Its alloys are used to make control rods for nuclear reactors because it will absorb neutrons and has a very high melting point.

Discovered : by A.G. Ekeberg in 1802

Isolated in Uppsala, Sweden

Origin : The element is named after Tantalus, in Greek mythology the father of Niobe.

Description :

A shiny, silvery metal that is very resistant to corrosion and so finds use in equipment for handling corrosive materials.

Discovered : by J.J. and F. Elhuijar in 1783

Isolated in Vergara, Spain

Origin : The name is derived from the Swedish ‘tungsten’, heavy stone, and the chemical symbol from ‘wolfram’, derived from the German ‘Wolf” (wolf) and ‘Rahm’ (dirt).

Description :

Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals and because of this it is used for the filaments of light bulbs. It is alloyed with other metals to strengthen them - for example, for military armour and cutting tools.

Discovered : by W. Noddack and co-workers in 1925

Isolated in Berlin, Germany

Origin : The element is named after 'Rhenus', the Latin name for the river Rhine.

Description :

A metal with a very high melting point, second only to tungsten. It is usually available as a grey powder and is among the rarest metals on Earth. Rhenium is used in filaments and for catalysts in the chemicals industry.

Discovered : by Smithson Tennant in 1803

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘osme’, meaning smell - the metal surface gives off a volatile osmium tetroxide, which has a characteristic odour.

Description :

A shiny silver metal that resists corrosion, and is the densest of all the elements and twice as heavy as lead. It is as rare as gold and, like gold, can be found as the free metal. It is little used except in a few alloys and in industry as a catalyst.

 


Discovered : by Smithson Tennant in 1803

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin ‘iris’, meaning rainbow.

Description :

A hard silvery metal and one of the rarest on Earth. It is almost as inert to attack as gold and is used in special alloys and for the contacts in spark plugs.

Discovered : known to native South Americans before Columbus arrived, and first taken to Europe in about 1750

Origin : The name is derived from the Spanish ‘platina’, meaning silver.

Description :

A silvery metal as resistant to corrosion and tarnishing as gold. It is almost as rare and consequently is likewise highly valued and used in jewellery. It is also used in the chemicals industry as a catalyst, in medicine as an anti-cancer drug, and in catalytic converters for car exhausts.

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Discovered : known since prehistoric times

Origin : The name is the Anglo-Saxon word for the metal and the symbol comes from the Latin ‘aurum’, gold.

Description :

A soft metal with a characteristic colour and since it is chemically unreactive, one of the few elements to occur in a natural state. It will dissolve in aqua regia (royal water), a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It can be beaten into very thin sheets (gold leaf) to be used as architectural ornament. Another use is in jewellery and some is also employed in the electronics industry and to colour glass or make it reflect heat . About 1500 tonnes of gold are mined each year, chiefly in South Africa and Russia, and most of this is stored as bullion. There is a lot of gold in the sea, but with only 1 gramme in 1,000,000 tonnes of seawater, schemes to reclaim gold from the oceans have always failed.

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations

Origin : The element is named after the planet Mercury and the symbol comes from the Latin ‘hydragyrum’, meaning liquid silver.

Description :

Mercury has fascinated people for millennia as a heavy liquid metal that can be extracted easily by heating cinnabar, a red ore (mercury sulfide). Mercury is known to be dangerous in all its forms, and use is now confined to industry where it is employed in the manufacture of chlorine and sodium hydroxide, although even here it is being phased out. Some is still used to treat seed corn to make it resistant to fungus disease, and in street lighting, dental amalgum and electrical apparatus. Older uses - in thermometers, in felt production and as a de-worming powder - have all been superseded. Mercury is widespread in the environment - every mouthful of food we eat contains a little. Our daily intake is about 0.01 milligramme (about a hundredth of an ounce in a lifetime), and this we can cope with easily. However, one form of mercury - methylmercury - is particularly dangerous; it can be formed by micro-organisms in polluted waters, absorbed by fish and so eaten by people.

Discovered : 1899 by Andrew Debierne

Isolated in Paris, France

Origin : From the Greek ‘aktino’ meaning ray.

Description :

A radioactive metal first extracted from natural uranium ores but now made from uranium in atomic reactors. It glows in the the dark because its intense radioactivity excites the surrounding air.

Discovered : by a group of scientists at Dubna, near Moscow, Russia in 1964, and independently by A. Ghiorso and co-workers at Berkeley, California, USA in 1969

Origin : The element is named after Lord Rutherford, a New Zealand physicist and chemist.

Description :

A radioactive metal which does not occur naturally and of which relatively few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only.

Discovered : at both Berkeley, California, USA, and Dubna, near Moscow, Russia in 1970

Origin : The element is named after the Russian town of Dubna.

Description :

A highly radioactive metal which does not occur naturally, and of which only a few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only.

Discovered : by A. Ghiorso and co-workers in 1974

Isolated in California, USA

Origin : The element is named after Glenn T Seaborg, the American nuclear chemist and Nobel prize winner.

Description :

A radioactive metal which does not occur naturally and is of research interest only. Only a few atoms have ever been made and its chemistry resembles that of tungsten.

Discovered : by P. Armbruster, G. Münzenberg and co-workers in 1981

Isolated in Darmstadt, Germany

Origin : The element is named after Niels Bohr, the Danish physicist.

Description :

A highly radioactive metal that does not occur naturally and of which only a few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only.

Discovered : by P. Armbruster, G. Munzenberg and co-workers in 1984

Isolated in Darmstadt, Germany

Origin : The element is named after the German state of Hesse, where the German Nuclear Research Institute is located.

Description :

A highly radioactive metal which does not occur naturally and only a few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only.

Discovered : by P. Armbruster, G. Munzenberg and co-workers in 1982

Isolated in Darmstadt, Germany

Origin : It is named after Lise Meitner, the Austrian physicist who first suggested spontaneous nuclear fission.

Descripton :

A highly radioactive metal, of which only a few atoms have ever been made.

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langer in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’, sun
Description :
A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium , for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tonnes, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.

Discovered : by J.L. Gay-Lussac and L.J. Thenard in Paris, France, and Sir Humphry Davy in London, UK in 1808

Origin : The name is derived from the Arabic 'buraq', borax, its principal ore.

Description :

Pure boron is a little-used dark powder, but boron compounds are important in many industries such as glass and detergent manufacture and agriculture. Pyrex glass is tough and heat resistant because of the boric acid used to make it. Boron is an essential mineral for plants but not animals - in fact it can be toxic in excess. We take in about 2 milligrammes each day from our food (2 ounces in a lifetime).

 

Discovered : known from prehistoric times.

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin ‘carbo’, charcoal.

Description :

There are a number of forms of this element including coke, soot, charcoal, graphite and diamond. In 1985, a new one was discovered consisting of ‘footballs’ of carbon atoms. The element itself is used as coke in steel making to reduce iron oxide to iron, as carbon black in printing, and as charcoal in sugar refining. However, carbon is also the basis of all life since it is part of DNA. The human body contains about 16 kilogrammes of carbon in one form or another. Carbon is also important environmentally as carbon dioxide, it makes up 350 parts per million of the atmosphere, and plants take it in as they grow. Carbon dioxide is also the gas formed when natural gas, oil and coal are burned.

 

Discovered : by Daniel Rutherford in 1772

Isolated in Edinburgh, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘nitron genes’, meaning nitre forming : nitre is potassium nitrate, commonly known as saltpetre.

Description :

A colourless, odourless gas that makes up 78% of the air. Nitrogen is essential for life since it is part of DNA, but it is also needed for protein and many other components of the living cell. There is a so-called ‘nitrogen cycle’ in nature - that is, it is possible to trace its movements from the air to plants, to animals, to the soil where it can be recycled or washed into rivers, and where some microbes can turn it back into nitrogen gas and return it to the atmosphere. About 50 million tonnes of nitrogen are extracted every year, mainly for use as fertiliser, but also for making plastics, dyes and explosives.

 

Discovered : 1886 by Henri Moissan

Isolated in Paris, France

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin ‘fleure’, to flow.

Description :

Fluorine salts, known as fluorides, were used for centuries in welding metals and for frosting glass before the element itself was isolated. Fluorine gas is the most reactive of all the elements and quickly attacks all metals - steel wool bursts into flames when exposed to it ! Fluorine is used to make uranium hexafluoride, needed by the nuclear power industry, and sulfur hexafluoride insulating gas for high-power electricity transformers, and to treat polythene to make it impermeable to solvents. Fluoride is an essential element for animals, strengthening teeth and bones. It is added to drinking water in some areas and to toothpaste. The average human body contains about 3 milligrammes (a hundredth of an ounce); too much fluoride is toxic.

 

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay and M.W. Travers in 1898

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘neos’, meaning new.

Description :

A colourless, odourless gas that comprises 18 parts per million of the air. Neon will not react with any other substance. It is produced from liquid air for ornamental lighting (i.e. neon signs) because it glows red when an electrical discharge is passed through it.


 

Discovered : 1825 by Hans Oersted

Isolated in Copenhagen, Denmark

Origin : From 'alumen', the Latin for the mineral alum.

Description :

The most abundant of metals. A lot of energy is needed to extract it from its ores : however, this is worthwhile because it does not rust and is easy to recycle. It is lightweight but tough and is widely used for window frames, aircraft parts, engines, kegs, cooking oil, drinks cans, etc. There may be a link between aluminium in the diet and Alzheimer’s disease (a form of senile dementia), but only a small amount of what we take in with our food is absorbed by our bodies. Foods with above average amounts of aluminium are tea, processed cheese, lentils and sponge cakes (where it comes from the rising agent). Cooking in aluminium pans does not greatly increase the amount in our diet except when cooking acid foods such as rhubarb. Some indigestion tablets are pure aluminium hydroxide !


Discovered : by J.J. Berzelius in 1824

Isolated in Stockholm, Sweden

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin ‘silicus’, meaning flint.

Description :

The second most abundant element on the surface of the Earth after oxygen. Sand and flint are silicon dioxide, as are semi-precious stones such as rock crystal and rhinestone. The element itself, when ultrapure, is blue-grey and used as the semi-conductor in ‘silicon chips’. Every year, 5,000 tonnes of semi-conductor-grade silicon and 500,000 tonnes of metallurgy-grade silicon are produced. Silicon is essential for some species and perhaps for humans in whom it is found in connective tissue and skin.


Discovered : by Hennig Brandt in 1669

Isolated in Hamburg, Germany

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘phosphoros’, meaning bringer of light, because it glows in the dark.

Description :


There are several forms of phosphorus. White phosphorus is manufactured industrially, glows in the dark, is spontaneously flammable when exposed to the air and is a deadly poison. Red phosphorus, made by heating white phosphorus, does not glow, is stable and is not poisonous. This is the material stuck on the side of boxes of safety matches on which the matches must be struck to light them. Phosphorus itself is essential to all forms of life since it is part of DNA, although there are many phosphorus compounds that are essential in the living cell. We take in about 1 gramme of phosphate a day, and we store about 750 grammes in our bodies since our bones are mainly calcium phosphate. In the environment and in living things, phosphorus is present as phosphate, which consists of one phosphorus atom at the centre of four oxygen atoms. Phosphates are used in fertilisers and detergents and in metal coatings to prevent corrosion. However, excess phosphates in rivers and lakes cause an over-growth of slimy green algae, which robs the water of its life-supporting oxygen.

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations

Origin : The name may have one or two derivations : the Sanskrit ‘sulvere’ or the Latin ‘sulphurium’, both meaning sulfur.

Description :

Occurs in large deposits as yellow crystals. It is stable in air and water but will burn if ignited, giving off the acrid gas, sulfur dioxide, its most famous compound, which is used to make sulfuric acid, the single most important industrial chemical. Sulfur dioxide is also produced when coal and oil are burned and is thought to be responsible for so called ‘acid rain’. Sulfur is essential to all living things and there is a sulfur cycle in nature. The average human contains 140 grammes (5 ounces) and takes in about 1 gramme a day.


Discovered : 1774 by C.W. Scheele

Isolated in Uppsala, Sweden

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘chloros’, meaning pale green.

Description :

A yellowy-green dense gas with a choking smell. It is very poisonous and was used as a weapon during the First World War. The gas is made on a large scale from salt (sodium chloride) and is used in the manufacture of chlorite bleach and PVC plastic, and to purify drinking water and to disinfect swimming pools. Our daily intake is about 6 grammes (a fifth of an ounce), mainly as salt, but we could manage with half this amoun

 

Discovered : 1899 by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay

Origin : From the Greek ‘argos’ meaning inactive.

Description :

The third most abundant gas making up one percent of the atmosphere. The quantity has increased since the Earth was formed because radioactive potassium turns into argon as it decays. Argon is a colourless, odourless gas that is totally inert to other substances, and for this reason it is ideal in tube lights.

 

 

Discovered : by P.E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran in 1875

Isolated in Paris, France

Origin : The name is derived from 'Gallia', the Latin name for France.

Description :

This was predicted to exist by the Russian chemist Dimitri Mendeleev because his periodic table of the elements had a gap below aluminium. He also forecast (correctly) some of the properties of the element, such as density. Gallium is a soft, silvery metal like aluminium and is used to make semi-conductors (gallium arsenide) and microwave equipment.

 

Discovered : by C.A. Winkler in 1886

Isolated in Frieberg, Germany

Origin : The name is derived from 'Germania', the Latin name for Germany .

Description :

A silvery semi-metal element used in semi-conductors and speciality glass for infrared devices. Germanium ores are very rare and the element is recovered as a by-product of zinc and copper refining. Our daily diet may contain as much as 1 milligramme, but theories that germanium is important to our health have been discredited.

 

Discovered : by Albertus Magnus in the 13th century

Origin : The name comes from 'arsenikon', the Greek name for the pigment yellow orpiment.

Description :

Although it is now strongly linked with poison, arsenic was once used widely as a medicine. Dr Fowler’s Solution (potassium arsenate dissolved in water) was a popular cure-all tonic in Victorian times - even Charles Dickens used it. Arsenic compounds are still employed in making special glass and semi-conductors (gallium arsenice), preserving wood and, in some countries, to fatten poultry and pigs. Nowadays its use is strictly controlled, although some scientists claim it is an essential element in our diet in very low doses. Some foods such as prawns contain a surprising amount of arsenic.

 

Discovered : by J.J. Berzelius in 1817

Isolated in Stockholm, Sweden

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘selene’, meaning moon.

Description :

Selenium can exist in two forms, as a silvery metal or as a red powder, and is used in photoelectric cells, photocopiers, solar cells and semiconductors. It is essential for some species, including humans, and our bodies contain about 14 milligrammes (1/20,000th of an ounce).

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay and M.W. Travers in 1898

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘kryptos’, meaning hidden

Description :

A colourless, odourless gas that is inert to everything but fluorine gas. The isotope krypton 86 has a line in its atomic spectrum that is now the standard measure of length : 1 metre is defined as exactly 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of this line. Krypton is one of the rarest gases in the Earth’s atmosphere, accounting for only 1 part per million by volume.

Discovered : by F. Reich and H. Richter in 1863

Isolated in Frieberg, Germany

Origin : The element is named after indigo, which is the colour of the brightest line in its spectrum.

Description :

A soft, silvery metal that is stable and used in low-melting alloys for fire-sprinkler systems in shops and warehouses. Some semi-conductors and transistors are made of indium arsenic and indium antimony.

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations

Origin : The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon tin; the chemical symbol comes from the Latin ‘stannum’, related to the word ‘stagnum’ (dripping), because tin melts easily.

Description :

A soft pliable metal but it is not used as such because, below 13 C, it slowly changes to a powder. Steel is plated with tin to make cans, and it is also used for solders. Some tin compounds are employed as anti-fouling paint for ships and boats to prevent barnacles, but even at low levels, these compounds are deadly to marine life especially oysters. Tin is thought to be an essential element for some living things and this may also be true for humans.

The All seeing eye of their fallen Angel god, Horus. Also on your one Dollar Bill

Discovered : in the Middle Ages by an unknown alchemist

Origin : From the Greek 'anti monos', not alone, and the symbol from the Latin word
'stibium', Mark, because the ore stibnite (antimony sulfide) was once used as mascara.

As in Mark of the Beast, who is indeed their god, Baal, who also is the false Christ to be, who will deceive the entire world, save those whose names are written in the Book of Life of the Lamb Slain since the foundation of the world.



Description :

A semi-metal used in industry to harden other metals. It was earlier used in the production of bells and metal type. It is a fairly rare metal and the main producing countries are China, Russia, Bolivia and South Africa.

Discovered : by Baron Franz Muller von Reichenstein in 1783

Isolated in Sibiu, Romania

Origin : The name is derived from the Latin ‘tellus’, meaning Earth.

Description :

A semi-metal obtained as a grey powder. Its compounds are to be avoided because not only are they poisonous but contact with even the tiniest amounts leads to unpleasant body odours!

 

Discovered : by Bernard Courtois in 1811

Isolated in Paris, France

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘iodes’, meaning violet

Description :

Iodine comes as black, shiny crystals that dissolve in alcohol; the result is sold as an antiseptic solution. Iodine salts (iodides) are used in dyes and photography, as industrial catalysts and in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Iodine is also an essential element for humans, who require a daily intake of iodine (as iodide) of about a tenth of a milligramme (only 1/300,000th of an ounce). Our bodies contain up to 20 milligrammes, mainly in the thyroid gland. Normally we get enough from the food we eat, but people eating food grown in areas where the soil lacks iodides can develop a swollen thyroid known as goitre.

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Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay and M.W. Travers in 1898

Isolated in London

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘xenos’, meaning strange.

Description :

A colourless, odourless gas that makes up 0.086 parts per million of the atmosphere. About half a tonne a year is produced from liquid air and used for research purposes.

Discovered : by W. Crookes in 1861

Isolated in London, UK

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘thallos’, meaning green shoot.

Description :

A soft, grey metal, rather like lead but it tarnishes easily. It was once used in rat poisons and hair removers but it is now banned.

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations

Origin : The name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon ‘laedan’. The chemical symbol comes from the Latin ‘plumbum’, meaning lead.

Description :

This easily-worked metal has been used for pipes, pewter and paint since Roman times. It has also been used in lead glazes for pottery and, in this century, as an additive to raise the octane level of petrol. All these uses have now either been banned, replaced or discouraged as lead is known to be detrimental to health, particularly that of children. Daily intake of lead from all sources is about a tenth of a milli gramme, and the average human body stores about 120 milligrammes in the bones. Lead is still widely used for cable sheathing, car batteries, lead crystal, radiation protection and in some solders.

Discovered : by an unknown alchemist in the 15th century

Origin : The name comes from the German 'weisse Masse' (white mass), which became Latinised as bisemutum.

Description :

A heavy, silvery, pink-tinged metal, but not used as such as it is too brittle. Basic bismuth carbonate is taken in tablet or liquid form for indigestion as ‘bismuth mixture’. Bismuth oxychloride is used in cosmetics to give a pearly effect.

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Discovered : by Marie Curie in 1898

Isolated in Paris, France

Origin : Marie Curie named the element after her homeland Poland.

Description :

Marie Curie isolated polonium from the uranium ore, pitchblend, in which it exists in tiny amounts. It is a radioactive metal produced today in gramme quantities from bismuth in nuclear reactors, and used as a source of alpha radiation or as a heat source in space vehicles.

Discovered : 1940 by D.R.Corson

Isolated in California, USA

Origin : From the Greek ‘astatos’ meaning unstable.

Description :

A dangerously radioactive element made in nuclear reactors, its half life is only eight hours.

Discovered : by F.E. Dorn

Isolated in Halle, Germany

Origin : The name is derived from radium.

Description :

Radon was first discovered as the gas produced from radium as it decayed in sealed ampoules. It is colourless and odourless, and is chemically inert, but it is dangerous because it gives off alpha rays. There is a detectable amount in the atmosphere, and concentrations can build up indoors in certain localities.

Discovered : 1803 by J.J. Berzelius and W. Hisinger

Isolated in Vestmanland, Sweden

Origin : The element is named after the asteroid Ceres, discovered in 1801.

Description :

A grey metal, more abundant than tin or lead and almost as abundant as zinc. It is little used because it tarnishes easily, reacts with water and burns when heated. A little cerium is employed in alloys, special glass and ceramics, but the best known use is in flints for pocket lighters.

Discovered : by Baron Auer von Welsbach in 1885

Isolated in Vienna, Austria

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘prasios didymos’, meaning green twin.

Description :

A soft, silvery metal employed in alloys, as flints for pocket lighters and for the yellow visor glass used to protect welders.

 

Discovered : by Baron von Welsbach in 1885

Isolated in Vienna, Austria

Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘neos didymos’, meaning new twin.

Description :

A fairly common but little used silvery metal. It is contained in some alloys for magnets, glass, glazes and lighter flints. Neodymium dust and salts are very irritating to the eyes.

Qabalah

Qabalah-C

In the Name of Jesus Christ the Lord, amen

The Last Deception

Section 2

  section 3   

section 4 

  section 5  

section 6  

section 7 

  section 8 

section  9     

section 10  

section 11  

section 12  

section 13 

section 14 "The Protocols of the Illuminated Elders of Tzion"

  section 15 

      section 16 "The Beast Has Risen" 

 section 16-B

 section 17  

  section 17-B  

  section 17-C   

section 17-D

  section 18    

section 18-B

section 19    

section 19-B

section 20  

 section 20-B 

  section 20-C 

  section 20-D 

  section 20-E

section 21 

  section 22  

section 23

section 24

section 25

Daniel's Seventy Weeks

Was Peter a Jew?

The Two Witnesses

"The Whore of Babylon"

Mystery Babylon

 Are the " Ael-ians coming"

Ael-ians II

Wall Street " The Mark" is Here

Wall Street II

Wall Street III

It has happened "War Declared upon and in America"

Declared section Part II

"Questions"

"All you ever need to know about their god and Qabalah"

Qabalah Part II

Qabalah Part III

National Identification Card

Prophecy Unfolding

A Sincere Request to  "Rapture" Teachers

"Seventh Trumpet"

Compulsory Constitutional Cremation

Homeland Security, "The Police State"

"The Fourth Beast"

The Babylonian Talmudic Mystical Qabalah

The Scribes of Baal

How will they do it- " The false-christ"

False Christ Part II

The Word

Baal's food Tax

"The Changing of the Guards"

"Summation" The beginning of sorrows has begun

"Moshiach ben Lucifer"

Satan's Tales "Wagging the Global Dog"

"Satan's Plan", Protocols of Zion ( of course they will dispute it's authenticity)

I Witch, New One World Order Seal

Satan's Enforcers of Quaballah

Satan's Enforcers Part 2

Satan's Enforcers Part 3

Satan's Enforcers Part 4

The Seed of God or the Seed of Satan, Your choice by faith

Pledge of Allegiance Part Two

I AM, the Revelation of Jesus Christ

King of the Noachides

"Beware the Mark"

"Beware the Mark" part two

"Beware the Mark" Part 3

"Beware the Mark" Part Four

"Beware the Mark" Part Five

 Harvest of Fear

"Harvest of Fear" Part Two

"Harvest of Fear" Part Three

National Organization Against Hasidic International Talmudic Enforcement

Where's Da Plane Boss, wheres da plane?

The Tarot Card Killer of Olam Ha Ba

The "Lessor Jew"

Temporary Coup d' Etat

The Federal Reserve, Fed up with the Fed?

The Protocols Today. Dispute this, Liars !

Protocols Today Part Two

Letter to a friend "It's not the Jews Dummy"

Identity of the Illuminati

The "Son's of the Synagogue of Satan"Chabad Lubavitch

Chabad Satan Part 1A

Chabad Satan Part 2

Chabad Satan Part 2A

Chabad Satan Part 2B

Chabad Satan Part 3

Chabad Satan Part 3A

Chabad Satan Part 4

Chabad Satan Part 4A

Chabad Satan Part 4B

Chabad Satan Part 4C

Chabad Satan Part 5

Chabad satan Part 5A

Chabad Satan Part 5B

Chabad Satan Part 5C

Chabad Satan Part 6

Chabad Satan Part 6B

Chabad Satan Part 6C

Chabad Satan Part 6D

Chabad Satan Part 7

Chabad Satan Part 7A

Chabad Satan Part 7B

Chabad Satan Part 7C

Chabad Satan Part 8

Chabad Satan Part 8A

Chabad Satan Part 8B

Chabad Satan Part 8C

Chabad Satan Part 8D

Chabad Satan Part 9

Chabad Satan Part 9A

Chabad Satan Part 9B

Chabad Satan Part 9C

Chabad Satan Part 9D

Chabad Satan Part 10

Chabad Satan Part 10A

Chabad Satan Part 10B

Chabad Satan Part 10C

Chabad Satan Part 10D

The Chabad Satan Wall of Destruction

Chabad Wall Part 2

Chabad Wall Part 3

Chabad Wall Part 4

The Chabad Phoenix is Rising

Columbia "The Queen of Heaven"

Patriot Akt II, Comrad 

The Infiltration of the leaven "Jerusalem Council"

Satan's One World Religion

OWR Part 2

OWR Part 3

OWR Part 4

One World Religion Part 5

One World Religion Part 6

One World Religion Part 7

Re the god of Talmud Bavli

Perpetual Purim

"The Raiser of Taxes"

Jewish Persecution

Obedient Ishmael Kislev 19, 5764

The Final Nazi

Nazi Part 2

Nazi Part 3

Nazi Part 4

The Lord of the Ring, the Return of the Talmudic king

Changing the Time and the Laws

anti-semitism?

Who murdered Jesus the Christ

"Replacement Theology" of Judaic Talmudism

Eating Rainbow Stew with a Silver Spoon, underneath a Noahide Sky

the gods

"The Two Whores"

Noahide News

Noahide News 2

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